Cover image for From top hats to baseball caps, from bustles to blue jeans : why we dress the way we do
Title:
From top hats to baseball caps, from bustles to blue jeans : why we dress the way we do
Author:
Perl, Lila.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York, NY : Clarion Books, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
118 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Summary:
Discusses the types of clothing people have worn throughout history, why they dressed the way they did, and how clothing reflects and even influences history.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780899198729
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library GT595 .P45 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library GT595 .P45 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Discusses the types of clothing people have worn throughout history, why they dressed the way they did, and how clothing reflects and even influences history.


Author Notes

Lila Perl was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1921. She received a B. A. from Brooklyn College and pursued additional studies at both Columbia University and New York University. She started writing children's books when her two children were in elementary school. During her lifetime, she wrote more than 60 works of fiction and nonfiction. Her works include the Fat Glenda series, Isabel's War, Lilli's Quest, The Great Ancestor Hunt: The Fun of Finding Out Who You Are, To the Golden Mountain: The Story of the Chinese Who Built the Transcontinental Railroad, and Behind Barbed Wire: The Story of Japanese Internment During World War II. In 1996, she co-authored the memoir Four Perfect Pebbles: A Holocaust Story with Marion Bluementhal Lazan. She died in December 2013 at the age of 92.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 5-9. What we wear reflects our times and how we see ourselves, according to this lively history of fashion in Europe and the U.S. Unfortunately, Perl's self-congratulatory tone implies that unlike us with our casual, relaxed, practical clothes here and now, they wore the weirdest things! And she uses lots of exclamation points to emphasize their silliness. (In contrast, Giblin's multicultural approach to table manners in From Hand to Mouth [BKL N 15 87] shows how fashionable custom--including our own--seems arbitrary and weird to the outsider.) Still, there's much here that kids will enjoy about how clothes are chosen for show and comfort, and how they've been affected over the years by things like class, women's liberation, war, and technology. The individual chapters on pants, skirts, shoes, and hats, illustrated with photographs and attractive pen drawings, demonstrate with a wealth of examples how images of beauty continue to change. Readers might get to thinking about our own strange fashions, such as the need for wearing brand-name sneakers with the laces untied. ~--Hazel Rochman


School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-8-- From earliest times men and women have used clothing to reflect status and position in society, and Perl's book serves as an interesting social commentary rather than as a reference source for style of dress. The interesting, storylike format leads readers through periods of history in western Europe and the United States, and will be easily understood by those with no background knowledge in this area. The illustrations, pen-and-ink drawings and photos, clearly represent the styles, and are grouped together to cover several pages of explanation rather than on the same page as the description. A far more extensive resource is Elisabeth McClellan's Historic Dress in America , (Ayer, 1969). This enjoyable book could enhance social studies and history in the areas of women's rights and social change. --Carrol McCarthy, Tower Hill School, Wilmington, DE (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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