Cover image for Great Britain and the United States : special relations since World War II
Title:
Great Britain and the United States : special relations since World War II
Author:
Hathaway, Robert M., 1947-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boston : Twayne Publishers, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
xix, 173 pages, 12 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 25 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780805779097

9780805792065
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library E183.8.G7 H36 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Yet another volume in Twayne's International History series (to explore post-World War II world affairs) is by a congressional staffer and the author of Ambiguous Partnerships: Britain and America: 1944-1947 (Columbia, 1981). The extent of the special relationship between the U.S. and Britain is dependent upon which side of the Atlantic it is viewed from. Often, the British have seen it as the special relationship, while the U.S., mindful of its greater role in the world at large, has seen it as a special relationship, among many. Hathaway concludes, among other things, that just as in Britain there is a greater commitment to U.S.-British partnership at 10 Downing Street than in Westminster, so, too, the same distinction prevails between the White House and Capitol Hill. But even at its worst, the special relationship is undeniable; in the administrations of the two leaders least committed to it, Edward Heath in Britain and Gerald Ford in the U.S., "British-American cooperation flourished in a variety of forms unmatched by two major powers anywhere else in the world." Bibliographic essay; to be indexed. --Allen Weakland


Library Journal Review

This conventional survey of postwar British-American relations focuses on high-level politics. Conflicts abound as the two countries chart a course gradually away from a Cold War in which they were special allies, to a point where the United States saw little need for a close relation, and Great Britain began to feel more a part of Europe. Personal relations between British and American leaders shaped the relationship, although self-interest propelled both sides. Public libraries that have David Dimbleby and David Reynolds's An Ocean Apart: the Relationship Between Britain and America in the Twentieth Century ( LJ 7/88) do not need this book; academic libraries do, especially for its excellent bibliographic essay.-- Pat Ensor, Indiana State Univ. Lib., Terre Haute (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Hathaway has written a brief survey of the Anglo-American "special relationship" since 1940. The footnotes indicate some manuscript/archival research but Hathaway's most important sources, at least by number of citations, were The Times of London and its New York namesake. Hathaway's intended audience is the American undergraduate rather than the specialist. Given that aim, his book must be deemed a success. He shows how WW II and the emergence of the Cold War did result in an "unusually close" alliance between the US and Britain. That alliance faced worsening strains starting in the 1950s--strains aggravated by differences over Vietnam. The upshot was its near breakdown during the 1970s. The years since 1980 have witnessed a rewarming of ties. Hathaway is astute on how the power disparity between the partners produced from the start differing perceptions of the relationship. "Stated baldly," he underlines, "Great Britain needed the United States far more than the American needed Britain." Despite the 1980s rapprochement, he concludes that "the long-term trend in the British-American relationship clearly lay--and lies--in the direction of reduced intimacy and less exclusivity." J. Braeman University of Nebraska--Lincoln


Booklist Review

Yet another volume in Twayne's International History series (to explore post-World War II world affairs) is by a congressional staffer and the author of Ambiguous Partnerships: Britain and America: 1944-1947 (Columbia, 1981). The extent of the special relationship between the U.S. and Britain is dependent upon which side of the Atlantic it is viewed from. Often, the British have seen it as the special relationship, while the U.S., mindful of its greater role in the world at large, has seen it as a special relationship, among many. Hathaway concludes, among other things, that just as in Britain there is a greater commitment to U.S.-British partnership at 10 Downing Street than in Westminster, so, too, the same distinction prevails between the White House and Capitol Hill. But even at its worst, the special relationship is undeniable; in the administrations of the two leaders least committed to it, Edward Heath in Britain and Gerald Ford in the U.S., "British-American cooperation flourished in a variety of forms unmatched by two major powers anywhere else in the world." Bibliographic essay; to be indexed. --Allen Weakland


Library Journal Review

This conventional survey of postwar British-American relations focuses on high-level politics. Conflicts abound as the two countries chart a course gradually away from a Cold War in which they were special allies, to a point where the United States saw little need for a close relation, and Great Britain began to feel more a part of Europe. Personal relations between British and American leaders shaped the relationship, although self-interest propelled both sides. Public libraries that have David Dimbleby and David Reynolds's An Ocean Apart: the Relationship Between Britain and America in the Twentieth Century ( LJ 7/88) do not need this book; academic libraries do, especially for its excellent bibliographic essay.-- Pat Ensor, Indiana State Univ. Lib., Terre Haute (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Hathaway has written a brief survey of the Anglo-American "special relationship" since 1940. The footnotes indicate some manuscript/archival research but Hathaway's most important sources, at least by number of citations, were The Times of London and its New York namesake. Hathaway's intended audience is the American undergraduate rather than the specialist. Given that aim, his book must be deemed a success. He shows how WW II and the emergence of the Cold War did result in an "unusually close" alliance between the US and Britain. That alliance faced worsening strains starting in the 1950s--strains aggravated by differences over Vietnam. The upshot was its near breakdown during the 1970s. The years since 1980 have witnessed a rewarming of ties. Hathaway is astute on how the power disparity between the partners produced from the start differing perceptions of the relationship. "Stated baldly," he underlines, "Great Britain needed the United States far more than the American needed Britain." Despite the 1980s rapprochement, he concludes that "the long-term trend in the British-American relationship clearly lay--and lies--in the direction of reduced intimacy and less exclusivity." J. Braeman University of Nebraska--Lincoln


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