Cover image for American women : their lives in their words : a documentary history
Title:
American women : their lives in their words : a documentary history
Author:
Rappaport, Doreen.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : T.Y. Crowell, 1990.
Physical Description:
xvi, 318 pages ; 25 cm
Summary:
Excerpts from women's diaries, letters, speeches, and autobiographical writings provide a first-person look at the history of American women.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780690048179

9780690048193
Format :
Book

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HQ1410 .R36 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Excerpts from women's diaries, letters, speeches, and autobiographical writings provide a first-person look at the history of American women.


Summary

Excerpts from women's diaries, letters, speeches, and autobiographical writings provide a first-person look at the history of American women.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Through their letters, diaries, speeches, and journals, many different women from our nation's past speak of their political and personal concerns and dreams. Rappaport's short, yet thorough, introductions place each selection within its historical framework.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 7-12-- From Anne Hutchinson and Anne Bradstreet, through the diaries of otherwise unknown frontierswomen and the quite well-known suffragists, to Betty Friedan and anonymous witnesses in Row vs. Wade, this book orchestrates the experiences of women in the United States. The women are cited from a wide variety of documents--poetry, published nonfiction, letters, legal materials--and are presented in their original formats, with archaic and sometimes obscure language intact. The difficulty of the language is the only drawback of this format. In between extracts, Rappaport deftly ties the individual lives and situations together with a narrative that gives the larger framework for the women's perceptions and gives the larger perspective. From the Native Americans and early immigrants to the women in industry and politics in the 18th and 19th centuries, through feminist theorists and activities in the 20th century, to the voices of several teenagers at the end of the century, the women here represent a wide variety of lifestyles. They range from highly educated and informed about their lives, to barely literate and only emerging in consciousness about the complex forces that shape their situations. The array of lives here is impressive, and the original language also colors the experience with authenticity and vigor. --Ruth K. MacDonald, Purdue Univ . Calumet, Hammond, IN (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Through their letters, diaries, speeches, and journals, many different women from our nation's past speak of their political and personal concerns and dreams. Rappaport's short, yet thorough, introductions place each selection within its historical framework.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 7-12-- From Anne Hutchinson and Anne Bradstreet, through the diaries of otherwise unknown frontierswomen and the quite well-known suffragists, to Betty Friedan and anonymous witnesses in Row vs. Wade, this book orchestrates the experiences of women in the United States. The women are cited from a wide variety of documents--poetry, published nonfiction, letters, legal materials--and are presented in their original formats, with archaic and sometimes obscure language intact. The difficulty of the language is the only drawback of this format. In between extracts, Rappaport deftly ties the individual lives and situations together with a narrative that gives the larger framework for the women's perceptions and gives the larger perspective. From the Native Americans and early immigrants to the women in industry and politics in the 18th and 19th centuries, through feminist theorists and activities in the 20th century, to the voices of several teenagers at the end of the century, the women here represent a wide variety of lifestyles. They range from highly educated and informed about their lives, to barely literate and only emerging in consciousness about the complex forces that shape their situations. The array of lives here is impressive, and the original language also colors the experience with authenticity and vigor. --Ruth K. MacDonald, Purdue Univ . Calumet, Hammond, IN (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.