Cover image for A moment's liberty : the shorter diary
Title:
A moment's liberty : the shorter diary
Author:
Woolf, Virginia, 1882-1941.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First American edition.
Publication Information:
San Diego : Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
xii, 516 pages ; 25 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780151618941
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PR6045.O67 Z466 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library PR6045.O67 Z466 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

The Diary of Virginia Woolf has been acclaimed as a masterpiece. Anne Olivier Bell edited the five-volume original, and she has now abridged the Diary in this splendidly readable single volume edition. "A fine opportunity to experience Woolf's biting wit and scathing depiction of her contemporaries" (Booklist). Introduction by Quentin Bell; Index.


Author Notes

Virginia Woolf was born in London, England on January 25, 1882. She was the daughter of the prominent literary critic Leslie Stephen. Her early education was obtained at home through her parents and governesses. After death of her father in 1904, her family moved to Bloomsbury, where they formed the nucleus of the Bloomsbury Group, a circle of philosophers, writers, and artists.

During her lifetime, she wrote both fiction and non-fiction works. Her novels included Jacob's Room, Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, Orlando, and Between the Acts. Her non-fiction books included The Common Reader, A Room of One's Own, Three Guineas, The Captain's Death Bed and Other Essays, and The Death of the Moth and Other Essays. Having had periods of depression throughout her life and fearing a final mental breakdown from which she might not recover, Woolf drowned herself on March 28, 1941 at the age of 59. Her husband published part of her farewell letter to deny that she had taken her life because she could not face the terrible times of war.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

A compilation featuring excerpts from the five volumes of Virginia Woolf's diaries, written from 1915 to 1941 and published between 1977 and 1984. Editor Bell has sought Woolf's most arresting comments and private reflections, keeping the focus on personal and social matters, in juxtaposition to Leonard Woolf's 1954 A Writer's Diary, which contained Woolf's "preoccupations" with her work. This collection will be greeted by librarians and Woolf's fans with the same enthusiasm that was evoked by the abridged collection of Woolf's letters (Congenial Spirits [BKL D 15 89]). A fine opportunity to experience Woolf's biting wit and scathing depictions of her contemporaries. --Denise Perry Donavin


Publisher's Weekly Review

Woolf's diaries of 1915-1941, published in five volumes between 1977 and 1984, were swiftly written whenever she had the time and inclination to record her dismay or delight, visits or visitors, encounters with creative minds, society ladies and servants, or was moved to ponder literary conundrums, book sales or nasty reviews. Abridged to a fifth of their original published size, the diaries here may appeal to a larger audience, not least because each year represented is prefaced by a wonderfully succinct overview. Here are Woolf's superbly drawn portraits of Max Beerbohm, T. S. Eliot, John Maynard Keynes, Katherine Mansfield--and her occasionally acerbic remarks on what they said and did. But the diaries are also a repository for luminous thoughts on birds and weather, the pleasures of walking or listening to music, and witty jabs at unwelcome guests and importunate journalists. ``I walk; I read; I write, without terrors or constrictions,'' Woolf observed. ``I feel that I have had a good draught of human life, and find much champagne in it.'' (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


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