Cover image for Be brave, Baby Rabbit
Title:
Be brave, Baby Rabbit
Author:
Manushkin, Fran.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Crown Publishers, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
32 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 24 cm
Summary:
While playing follow-the-leader with his big sister, Baby Rabbit can't manage to jump over a bushel basket; but, after he stands up a to a Halloween monster, he has the confidence to make the leap.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780517575734

9780517575741
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Audubon Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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Anna M. Reinstein Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Holiday
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On Order

Summary

Summary

While playing follow-the-leader with his big sister, Baby Rabbit can't manage to jump over a bushel basket; but, after he stands up a to a Halloween monster, he has the confidence to make the leap.


Summary

While playing follow-the-leader with his big sister, Baby Rabbit can't manage to jump over a bushel basket; but, after he stands up a to a Halloween monster, he has the confidence to make the leap.


Reviews 2

School Library Journal Review

Following his big sister in a leap over the apple basket, Baby Rabbit falls on his nose on Halloween morning. Then Mother Rabbit takes her children out trick-or-treating. A nice progression spanning three households shows timid Baby Rabbit becoming accustomed to the rituals of Halloween. By the third house he's knocking bravely on the door. He even roars back when a purple monster (actually Grandpa Rabbit) chases them down the path. Once they are all home Baby Rabbit repeats his jump over the apple basket and this time lands safely on the other side. The watercolor and pencil pictures soften the harsh night setting; they are friendly and tame. Yet on the issue of bravery, the book's focus is diffused. Baby Rabbit's initial fall is not because he's afraid; however, the story implies that his final athletic prowess is due to his newfound bravery. The writing is straightforward--even bland--although the care and support Father and Mother Rabbit offer their young ones is evident throughout. --Martha Topol, Interlochen Public Library, MI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Following his big sister in a leap over the apple basket, Baby Rabbit falls on his nose on Halloween morning. Then Mother Rabbit takes her children out trick-or-treating. A nice progression spanning three households shows timid Baby Rabbit becoming accustomed to the rituals of Halloween. By the third house he's knocking bravely on the door. He even roars back when a purple monster (actually Grandpa Rabbit) chases them down the path. Once they are all home Baby Rabbit repeats his jump over the apple basket and this time lands safely on the other side. The watercolor and pencil pictures soften the harsh night setting; they are friendly and tame. Yet on the issue of bravery, the book's focus is diffused. Baby Rabbit's initial fall is not because he's afraid; however, the story implies that his final athletic prowess is due to his newfound bravery. The writing is straightforward--even bland--although the care and support Father and Mother Rabbit offer their young ones is evident throughout. --Martha Topol, Interlochen Public Library, MI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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