Cover image for Families at war : voices from the troubles
Title:
Families at war : voices from the troubles
Author:
Taylor, Peter, 1942-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
London : BBC Books, 1989.
Physical Description:
206 pages ; 23 cm
General Note:
Based on a BBC 1 documentary trilogy, with additional material.
Language:
English
Corporate Subject:
ISBN:
9780563207887

9780563207870
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library DA990.U46 T39 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Author Notes

Peter Taylor was the author of eight story collections and three novels, including A Summons to Memphis, for which he won the Pulitzer Prize.

He died in 1994.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Peter Taylor was the author of eight story collections and three novels, including A Summons to Memphis, for which he won the Pulitzer Prize.

He died in 1994.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

An illuminating overview of the contemporary status of the Irish conflict. Drawn from extensive interviews with citizens representing all factions involved in Northern Ireland, each chapter provides a firsthand account of a family unit attempting to cope with fear, uncertainty, and tragedy. In addition to conversations with British soldiers, Protestant Unionists, and Roman Catholic Nationalists, the author also includes conversations with victims who do not profess allegiance to any particular political philosophy. What inevitably emerges is a forlorn portrait of a nation and a people torn hopelessly asunder. A haunting testament to the tremendous spiritual expense of civil war. Chronology, bibliography; index. ~--Margaret Flanagan


Publisher's Weekly Review

This book, companion to a BBC-TV documentary, marks the 20-year presence of British troops in Northern Ireland by exploring the feelings of grieving families on both sides of the conflict. The interviews, conducted by television reporter Taylor, concentrate on the human dimension of living with--and through--violence in support of a cause. We hear from a Londonderry woman who is a far remove from the British stereotype of the Irish Republican mother; from a British officer whose military career has been spent in Northern Ireland; from the mother of Mairead Farrell, a middle-class, convent-educated woman gunned down in Gibraltar as an alleged IRA volunteer; from a prisoner who repents of his youthful political terrorism, calling it ``too long a sacrifice.'' Intractable suffering for Protestant and Catholic alike, English or Irish, Nationalist or Unionist, is revealed in lives shaped by ancient enmity, and lamented in these moving personal expressions. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


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