Cover image for The soup bone
Title:
The soup bone
Author:
Johnston, Tony.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
San Diego : Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, [1990]

©1990
Summary:
Looking for a soup bone on Halloween, a little old lady finds a hungry skeleton instead.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780152772550
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Childrens Area-Holiday
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Childrens Area-Holiday
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Holiday
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Holiday
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Looking for a soup bone on Halloween, a little old lady finds a hungry skeleton instead.


Author Notes

Tony Johnston was born in Los Angeles, California on January 30, 1942. She received a B.A. in history and an M.A in education from Stanford University. Before becoming a full-time author, she worked as a fourth-grade teacher.

She has written over 70 books for children. Her titles include Amber on the Mountain, the Cowboy and the Black-Eyed Pea, Day of the Dead, the Ghost of Nicholas Greebe, the Sparky and Eddie series, and the Adventures of Mole and Troll. Her first adult novel was Any Small Goodness.

Her works have earned her several awards including a Children's Choice Award for Four Scary Stories and the Beatty Award in 2002 for Any Small Goodness.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 4-8. The strangeness that lurks in an ordinary house is the gruesome delight of this Halloween story. Even on the cover an old-fashioned old lady dances happily on the grass, while a white bony hand comes for her from underground and the white chimney smoke rises straight up in terror from her roof. The story begins inside her cozy kitchen, but the illustrations hint at transformation and disorder. The little old lady, lonely and hungry, needs a good bone for her soup. She searches everywhere, inside and out, but what she finds is lots of bones--a skeleton comes out of the grave, and it runs after her, "clicking and clacking," right into her house. Of course she's a witch, with brooms in her neat cupboard, and she scares that skeleton with a Halloween trick. Tomes' paintings are precise and witty, in shades of brown and gray with white exclamation points of bone and smoke and crescent moon. They prepare us for the cozy evening--skeleton and old lady dine together; they talk and eat their soup, and later she plays the piano and he plays his bones. ~--Hazel Rochman


Publisher's Weekly Review

Enhanced by Tomes's typically rusticated palette, this droll tale stars an old lady who makes several bones about her Halloween search for the perfect ingredient. Ages 4-8. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-- One Halloween night, a lonely little old lady searches for a bone to add to her vegetable soup. Finding none inside, she goes out to dig and unearths an entire skeleton. After chasing the woman up a tree, the skeleton goes into the house and discovers the soup. It in turn is frightened and is chased by a dog, and finally hides under the bed. After cornering the skeleton, the dog is revealed to be none other than the little old lady herself--dressed in her Halloween costume. The two make a pact not to frighten one another. Then, after sharing the soup and each other's company, they venture out together to ``scare somebody,'' since it is, after all, Halloween night. Johnston's text has the easy cadence of a folktale, making it a good choice for reading aloud. Tomes's familiar gouache paintings reinforce the whimsical quality of the original tale. Even a casual observer will notice the visual clues throughout the pages. A palette of soft muddy browns and grays, with accents of orange, red, and green, creates the ambience of a late October evening. While any promise of a spooky, spine-tingling tale fades early on, this is nevertheless satisfying: a good choice for Halloween story hours and a foil for more sensational yarns. --Corinne Camarata, Port Washington Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.