Cover image for Jack London and his daughters
Title:
Jack London and his daughters
Author:
London, Joan.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Berkeley, CA : Heyday Books in conjuction with Rick Heide, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
vi, 184 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 23 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780930588441

9780930588434
Format :
Book

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PS3523.O46 Z74 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

This account vividly recaptures the pain and yearning of Joan London for the father who left the family circle. A very different London story, it tells of growing family tensions and what it meant to live in the glow of a famous but absent father. Includes a selection of photographs Jack London kept for his daughter, and a preface by Bart Abbott, Joan London's son and Jack London's grandson.Joan London brings us an intimate portrait of the Jack London only she knew, and...adds a key piece to the colorful mosaic of California life and literature. -- San Francisco Chronicle


Author Notes

Joan Elizabeth London was born on July 24, 1948 in Australia. She is an author of short stories, screenplays and novels. She graduated from the University of Western Australia having studied English and French, has taught English as a second language and is a bookseller. London is the author of two collections of stories. The first, Sister Ships, won The Age Book of the Year (1986), and the second, Letter to Constantine, won the Steele Rudd Award and the West Australian Premier's Award for Fiction (both in 1994). The two were published together as The New Dark Age. She has published three novels, Gilgamesh, The Good Parents and The Golden Age.

In 2015 she was shortlisted for the Stella Prize for her novel The Golden Age. This title also shared n the 2015 NSW Premier's People Choice Award along with Only the Animals by Ceridwen Dovey. Joan London also won the $30,000 Nita B Kibble Literary Award in 2015 which recognises the work of an established Australian woman writer for her title The Golden Age. This same title also won in the fiction category for the Queensland Literary Awards 2015.

Joan London was awarded a living treasure award in 2015 by the Western Australian state government. The award is given to `highly regarded and skilled' career artists who have worked within or created work about Western Australia, passed on their knowledge to other artists, and demonstrated a commitment or contribution to the Western Australian arts sector. In 2015 London also won the Patrick White Literary Award which is awarded to authors who 'have made a significant but inadequately recognised contribution to Australian literature'. She was also recognized with a Prime Minister Literary Award in the fiction category with her title The Golden Age. In 2016, The Golden Age won the WA Premier¿s Book Award for Fiction.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Joan Elizabeth London was born on July 24, 1948 in Australia. She is an author of short stories, screenplays and novels. She graduated from the University of Western Australia having studied English and French, has taught English as a second language and is a bookseller. London is the author of two collections of stories. The first, Sister Ships, won The Age Book of the Year (1986), and the second, Letter to Constantine, won the Steele Rudd Award and the West Australian Premier's Award for Fiction (both in 1994). The two were published together as The New Dark Age. She has published three novels, Gilgamesh, The Good Parents and The Golden Age.

In 2015 she was shortlisted for the Stella Prize for her novel The Golden Age. This title also shared n the 2015 NSW Premier's People Choice Award along with Only the Animals by Ceridwen Dovey. Joan London also won the $30,000 Nita B Kibble Literary Award in 2015 which recognises the work of an established Australian woman writer for her title The Golden Age. This same title also won in the fiction category for the Queensland Literary Awards 2015.

Joan London was awarded a living treasure award in 2015 by the Western Australian state government. The award is given to `highly regarded and skilled' career artists who have worked within or created work about Western Australia, passed on their knowledge to other artists, and demonstrated a commitment or contribution to the Western Australian arts sector. In 2015 London also won the Patrick White Literary Award which is awarded to authors who 'have made a significant but inadequately recognised contribution to Australian literature'. She was also recognized with a Prime Minister Literary Award in the fiction category with her title The Golden Age. In 2016, The Golden Age won the WA Premier¿s Book Award for Fiction.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

These recollections by one of London's two daughters by his first wife, Bess, offer no insight into either her father, whom she barely knew, or the intriguing Charmian, for whom he divorced Bess. Written by a Victorian in a Victorian style that dances politely around her subject, London's work gives us only a tantalizingly vague sketch of a driven, erratic man whose indifference toward his offspring warped her early life. A nostalgic look at turn-of-the-century Oakland, California, her book (better called Jack London's Daughter ) is a generic portrait of the child as victim of divorce. Readers seeking an understanding of London should look elsewhere.-- Charles C. Nash, Cottey Coll., Nevada, Mo. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Library Journal Review

These recollections by one of London's two daughters by his first wife, Bess, offer no insight into either her father, whom she barely knew, or the intriguing Charmian, for whom he divorced Bess. Written by a Victorian in a Victorian style that dances politely around her subject, London's work gives us only a tantalizingly vague sketch of a driven, erratic man whose indifference toward his offspring warped her early life. A nostalgic look at turn-of-the-century Oakland, California, her book (better called Jack London's Daughter ) is a generic portrait of the child as victim of divorce. Readers seeking an understanding of London should look elsewhere.-- Charles C. Nash, Cottey Coll., Nevada, Mo. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.