Cover image for Schooling disadvantaged children : racing against catastrophe
Title:
Schooling disadvantaged children : racing against catastrophe
Author:
Natriello, Gary.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Teachers College Press, Teachers College, Columbia University, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
xi, 253 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780807730140

9780807730157
Format :
Book

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LC4091 .N39 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

This volume assesses the current status of disadvantaged children in American society and offers a set of policy recommendations for addressing their educational needs. The authors begin by describing the various definitions of disadvantaged used by researchers and policy makers, linking these definitions to the strategies and policies they imply in efforts to address the problems of the disadvantaged. Part 1 also includes a sociodemographic profile of the disadvantaged and a projection of changes in that population over the next 35 years.


Summary

This volume assesses the current status of disadvantaged children in American society and offers a set of policy recommendations for addressing their educational needs. The authors begin by describing the various definitions of disadvantaged used by researchers and policy makers, linking these definitions to the strategies and policies they imply in efforts to address the problems of the disadvantaged. Part 1 also includes a sociodemographic profile of the disadvantaged and a projection of changes in that population over the next 35 years.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

For complex reasons, the American disadvantaged student received little attention from educational researchers in the 1980s. This new important monograph affirms a new attention. The authors are not unaware of the herculean efforts on behalf of disadvantaged students in the 1960s and 1970s, largely an integral part of the Johnson administration's "War on Poverty." This is evident in the formidable bibliography. The genesis of this study lies in investigations on school dropouts undertaken for the American Educational Research Association, responding to the report of the National Commission on Excellence in Education in the mid-1980s. Continuing research by the authors on school dropouts led them to broaden their research "to include the entire population of disadvantaged students." The volume addresses specific concerns: Part 1 examines who the educationally disadvantaged are; Part 2 looks at education and social programs designed to address the problems of the disadvantaged; in Part 3 new directions for addressing the needs of disadvantaged youth are suggested. The authors' conclusions and recommendations are distilled in what they call the "New Three R's," i.e., resources, restructuring, and research. This is a cogent analysis and a compelling argument on behalf of the disadvantaged student. The authors are not alarmist in asserting that failure in this critical area "condemns us to a declining national standard of living in the future." An essential acquisition for education and social science collections. Level: Upper-division undergraduates and above. F. Cordasco Montclair State College


Choice Review

For complex reasons, the American disadvantaged student received little attention from educational researchers in the 1980s. This new important monograph affirms a new attention. The authors are not unaware of the herculean efforts on behalf of disadvantaged students in the 1960s and 1970s, largely an integral part of the Johnson administration's "War on Poverty." This is evident in the formidable bibliography. The genesis of this study lies in investigations on school dropouts undertaken for the American Educational Research Association, responding to the report of the National Commission on Excellence in Education in the mid-1980s. Continuing research by the authors on school dropouts led them to broaden their research "to include the entire population of disadvantaged students." The volume addresses specific concerns: Part 1 examines who the educationally disadvantaged are; Part 2 looks at education and social programs designed to address the problems of the disadvantaged; in Part 3 new directions for addressing the needs of disadvantaged youth are suggested. The authors' conclusions and recommendations are distilled in what they call the "New Three R's," i.e., resources, restructuring, and research. This is a cogent analysis and a compelling argument on behalf of the disadvantaged student. The authors are not alarmist in asserting that failure in this critical area "condemns us to a declining national standard of living in the future." An essential acquisition for education and social science collections. Level: Upper-division undergraduates and above. F. Cordasco Montclair State College