Cover image for Time journeys : a search for cosmic destiny and meaning
Title:
Time journeys : a search for cosmic destiny and meaning
Author:
Halpern, Paul, 1961-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : McGraw-Hill, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
xv, 153 pages ; 23 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780070257061

9780070257047
Format :
Book

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QB209 .H25 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Reviews 2

Choice Review

Halpern's central focus in this work is the contrast between the linear and circular conceptions of time. Although his approach is firmly grounded in classical and modern physics, his treatment of the perplexing questions of time involve him in discussions of Indian and Greek philosophy, Christian theology, economics, and science fiction. His thesis is twofold: first, that many of the ancient debates on the nature and structure of time are still alive in theoretical physics and, second, that ultimately one's personal views on mortality must affect one's perspective on scientific models of time. The discussions are very brief, but the most illuminating are those of the work of cosmologists Stephen Hawking and Roger Penrose, and the distinction between continuous and atomistic time. As a popular work, this book stands alongside S.W. Hawking's A Brief History of Time (CH, Jul'88) and G.J. Whitrow's two books, What Is Time? (1972) and The Natural Philosophy of Time (1961; 2nd ed., CH, Jan'81). Undergraduate audiences as well as interested general readers. L. B. McHenry Wittenberg University


Choice Review

Halpern's central focus in this work is the contrast between the linear and circular conceptions of time. Although his approach is firmly grounded in classical and modern physics, his treatment of the perplexing questions of time involve him in discussions of Indian and Greek philosophy, Christian theology, economics, and science fiction. His thesis is twofold: first, that many of the ancient debates on the nature and structure of time are still alive in theoretical physics and, second, that ultimately one's personal views on mortality must affect one's perspective on scientific models of time. The discussions are very brief, but the most illuminating are those of the work of cosmologists Stephen Hawking and Roger Penrose, and the distinction between continuous and atomistic time. As a popular work, this book stands alongside S.W. Hawking's A Brief History of Time (CH, Jul'88) and G.J. Whitrow's two books, What Is Time? (1972) and The Natural Philosophy of Time (1961; 2nd ed., CH, Jan'81). Undergraduate audiences as well as interested general readers. L. B. McHenry Wittenberg University