Cover image for Beyond detente : Soviet foreign policy and U.S. options
Title:
Beyond detente : Soviet foreign policy and U.S. options
Author:
Feffer, John.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Noonday Press, 1990.
Physical Description:
xvii, 237 pages : maps ; 21 cm
General Note:
"A report prepared for the American Friends Service Committee."
Language:
English
Added Corporate Author:
ISBN:
9780809029549

9780374522131
Format :
Book

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E183.8.S65 F44 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Reviews 4

Booklist Review

In this grand tour d'horizon of Soviet foreign policy past and present, Feffer is firmly in the camp of "revisionist" historians, for whom the cold war was conceived and maintained more by American intransigence than by Russian expansionism. Without arguing the (de)merits of that point of view, the incontestable fact is that the conflict's abatement has coincided with the revolutionary evaporation of one side's chief characteristic: the one-party state. Describing the origins of this incredible transformation to the general reader is Feffer's goal in the first, primerlike, part of the book. His more didactic intent, indicated by a section entitled "Six U.S. Myths about the Soviet Union," is to persuade that reader of the obsolescence--nay, the nefariousness--of U.S. military policies to date, particularly those of the Reagan administration, which is likened to a "criminal syndicate." To these he opposes "alternative" defense policies for the emerging era, starting with spiking our ICBMs. Though decidedly pacifist in tone, this work retains enough balance that it achieves its stated goal of introducing the novice to the incipient changes in international affairs. Notes, bibliography; to be indexed. --Gilbert Taylor


Library Journal Review

This is a report prepared for the American Friends Service Committee, a Quaker organization. Aimed at the informed general reader, the book argues that the recent shifts in Soviet foreign policy under Gorbachev result from domestic imperatives. Whether or not this positive trend in the cycle of detente is sustained depends on timely American responses to Soviet overtures. A generally balanced treatment; readers will especially benefit from Feffer's concise and informative discussion of domestic sources of Soviet external relations. Rapidly transpiring events in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe have dated portions of the book--an occupational hazard for works of this type. Still, a useful addition for larger international affairs collections.-- Cleveland R. Fraser, Furman Univ., Greenville, S.C. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

In this grand tour d'horizon of Soviet foreign policy past and present, Feffer is firmly in the camp of "revisionist" historians, for whom the cold war was conceived and maintained more by American intransigence than by Russian expansionism. Without arguing the (de)merits of that point of view, the incontestable fact is that the conflict's abatement has coincided with the revolutionary evaporation of one side's chief characteristic: the one-party state. Describing the origins of this incredible transformation to the general reader is Feffer's goal in the first, primerlike, part of the book. His more didactic intent, indicated by a section entitled "Six U.S. Myths about the Soviet Union," is to persuade that reader of the obsolescence--nay, the nefariousness--of U.S. military policies to date, particularly those of the Reagan administration, which is likened to a "criminal syndicate." To these he opposes "alternative" defense policies for the emerging era, starting with spiking our ICBMs. Though decidedly pacifist in tone, this work retains enough balance that it achieves its stated goal of introducing the novice to the incipient changes in international affairs. Notes, bibliography; to be indexed. --Gilbert Taylor


Library Journal Review

This is a report prepared for the American Friends Service Committee, a Quaker organization. Aimed at the informed general reader, the book argues that the recent shifts in Soviet foreign policy under Gorbachev result from domestic imperatives. Whether or not this positive trend in the cycle of detente is sustained depends on timely American responses to Soviet overtures. A generally balanced treatment; readers will especially benefit from Feffer's concise and informative discussion of domestic sources of Soviet external relations. Rapidly transpiring events in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe have dated portions of the book--an occupational hazard for works of this type. Still, a useful addition for larger international affairs collections.-- Cleveland R. Fraser, Furman Univ., Greenville, S.C. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.