Cover image for The forgotten victor : General Sir Richard O'Connor, KT, GCB, DSO, MC
Title:
The forgotten victor : General Sir Richard O'Connor, KT, GCB, DSO, MC
Author:
Baynes, John Christopher Malcolm.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
London ; Washington, [D.C.] : Brassey's ; N[ew] Y[ork], N.Y. : Distributed in North America by Macmillan, 1989.
Physical Description:
xiv, 320 pages, 33 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm
General Note:
Maps on lining papers.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780080362694
Format :
Book

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library U55.O26 B38 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

British generals between Wellington and Montgomery tend to be vague, nebulous figures if not totally unknown to Americans. This is a fine biography of a man's whose life story offers insight into British actions during WWII. 4444444400^0000 44444 Annotation(c) 2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)


Reviews 1

Choice Review

One of the gaps in the story of British generalship during WWII has long been the lack of a good study of General Sir Richard O'Connor. O'Connor's stunning victory over the Italians in the western desert during the winter of 1940-41, perhaps the best example of mobile warfare by the British during the entire conflict, brought Field Marshal Erwin Rommel to North Africa. This led to O'Connor's capture. Had he remained active, Field Marshal Viscount Montgomery might never have got his great opportunity. When O'Connor escaped from Italian custody in 1943, however, he had aged and events and techniques had passed him by. A competent corps commander under Montgomery in Europe in 1944, O'Connor ended his career as Adjutant General of the British Army in 1947 (Montgomery, typically crass, fired him over a minor disagreement). Baynes does a competent job although, oddly, he makes no use of the now considerable evidence on the impact of ultraintelligence on military operations. Specialists will find little new, but general readers will meet one of WW II's more interesting "might-have-beens." -R. A. Callahan, University of Delaware


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