Cover image for Handsome as anything
Title:
Handsome as anything
Author:
Gerber, Merrill Joan.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Scholastic, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
168 pages ; 22 cm
Summary:
Pulled in different directions by her sisters and the three men in whom she is interested, fifteen-year-old Rachel struggles to find her own identity.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780590430197
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library FICTION Young Adult Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Pulled in different directions by her sisters and the three men in whom she is interested, fifteen-year-old Rachel struggles to find her own identity.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

"People disappoint me, which is why I have started wearing black," begins Rachel Leah Kaminsky in what actually turns out to be an entertaining novel that combines light romance with the theme of self-discovery. Who does Rachel really like: Avram, the handsome orthodox rabbinical student she meets at camp; Jason, the motorcyclist who favors Zen and haunts the Bargain Buggy where Leah buys her clothes; or the baker Karl, who sends her a basket of bread instead of a bouquet of flowers? She's attracted to all three. Her sister Franny tells her not to trust guys who exert control over women in all kinds of subtle ways, but her other sister, Erica, seems blissfully happy preparing for her wedding. Rachel isn't sure she feels the same as either of them. What is she to do? A likable character, who views her problems through a scrim of good humor, Rachel, of course, finally figures it out. And with a stiff poke at religion and some feminist rhetoric spicing things up, Gerber turns Rachel's dilemma into a breezy read. ~--Stephanie Zvirin


School Library Journal Review

Gr 7 Up-- Rachel Kaminsky, 16, is a contemporary Jew whose parents no longer go to the synagogue. During the summer before twelfth grade, she finds herself attracted to three boys: one is going to be a rabbi; one rides a motorcycle and studies Zen; one is studying to be a baker and comes from a non-Jewish German family. At first the story seems to center on Rachel's search for the right young man. It is, in fact, the story of her search for identity. Readers ``hear'' the thoughts that drift through Rachel's head as she questions religion, prejudice, women's lib, tradition, and relationships in order to come to terms with her own future. Unlike most of Gerber's young-adult novels, this one does not deal with a teen in a crisis situation. Instead, it is a simple, easy-to-follow story of a girl obsessed with many of the concerns of most teens. Character and plot development are appropriately light. Those looking for a pleasant story will welcome this addition to their library's collection. --Dona Weisman, Northeast Texas Lib . System, Garland (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Google Preview