Cover image for Quitting cocaine : the struggle against impulse
Title:
Quitting cocaine : the struggle against impulse
Author:
Shaffer, Howard, 1948-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Lexington, Mass. : Lexington Books, [1989]

©1989
Physical Description:
xxii, 198 pages ; 24 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780669170986

9780669196900
Format :
Book

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RC568.C6 S48 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Considers current research, treatments, government involvement, and the process of addiction; discusses also how the media can "make or break" the perception of addiction problems. Annotation(c) 2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)


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Reviews 2

Choice Review

Shaffer and Jones (Harvard Medical School) organize Quitting Cocaine into two parts: the first half deals with general issues of cocaine, models of addiction, and the relationship of the drug to media and societal parameters; the second half is based on the authors' six-phase model of the addiction and recovery process. This approach is based on the notion that there are "natural cocaine quitters" who recover from compulsive cocaine abuse without professional help. The authors contrast this model with the disease model of addiction, yet they provide no statistical data to strengthen their position. The text is anecdotal, with "quotes" from "natural quitters." No graphs, tables, charts, and data are provided; readers will have no idea of the number of "natural quitters" actually interviewed. Moreover, this unilateral view of cocaine addiction omits consideration of addicts who are caught in a downward spiral. The book's focus on recovery without professional help would benefit from statistical documentation. The footnote reference to Narcotics Anonymous and Alcoholics Anonymous is an unforgivable slight to the importance of organizations that have saved many lives. L. Gillikin Hampton Counseling Services


Choice Review

Shaffer and Jones (Harvard Medical School) organize Quitting Cocaine into two parts: the first half deals with general issues of cocaine, models of addiction, and the relationship of the drug to media and societal parameters; the second half is based on the authors' six-phase model of the addiction and recovery process. This approach is based on the notion that there are "natural cocaine quitters" who recover from compulsive cocaine abuse without professional help. The authors contrast this model with the disease model of addiction, yet they provide no statistical data to strengthen their position. The text is anecdotal, with "quotes" from "natural quitters." No graphs, tables, charts, and data are provided; readers will have no idea of the number of "natural quitters" actually interviewed. Moreover, this unilateral view of cocaine addiction omits consideration of addicts who are caught in a downward spiral. The book's focus on recovery without professional help would benefit from statistical documentation. The footnote reference to Narcotics Anonymous and Alcoholics Anonymous is an unforgivable slight to the importance of organizations that have saved many lives. L. Gillikin Hampton Counseling Services