Cover image for The ideology of the aesthetics
Title:
The ideology of the aesthetics
Author:
Eagleton, Terry, 1943-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Cambridge, MA, USA : Basil Blackwell, 1990.
Physical Description:
426 pages ; 22 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780631163015

9780631163022
Format :
Book

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library BH151 .E2 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Presenting no less than a history and critique of the concept of the aesthetic throughtout modern Western thought, The Ideology of the Aesthetic is a critical survey of modern Western philosphy, focusing in particular on the complex relations between aesthetics, ethics, and politics.


Summary

The Ideology of the Aesthetic presents a history and critique of the concept of the aesthetic throughout modern Western thought. As such, this is a critical survey of modern Western philosophy, focusing in particular on the complex relations between aesthetics, ethics and politics. Eagleton provides a brilliant and challenging introduction to these concerns, as characterized in the work of Kant, Schiller, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Heidegger, Lukacs, Adorno, Habermas, and others.

Wide in span, as well as morally and politically committed, this is Terry Eagleton′s major work to date. It forms both an original enquiry and an exemplary introduction.


Author Notes

Terry Eagleton received a Ph.D from Cambridge University. He is a literary critic and a writer. He has written about 50 books including Shakespeare and Society, Criticism and Ideology, The Ideology of the Aesthetic, Literary Theory, The Illusions of Postmodernism, Why Marx Was Right, The Event of Literature, and Across the Pond: An Englishman's View of America. He wrote a novel entitled Saints and Scholars, several plays including Saint Oscar, and a memoir entitled The Gatekeeper. He is also the chair in English literature in Lancaster University's department of English and creative writing.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Terry Eagleton received a Ph.D from Cambridge University. He is a literary critic and a writer. He has written about 50 books including Shakespeare and Society, Criticism and Ideology, The Ideology of the Aesthetic, Literary Theory, The Illusions of Postmodernism, Why Marx Was Right, The Event of Literature, and Across the Pond: An Englishman's View of America. He wrote a novel entitled Saints and Scholars, several plays including Saint Oscar, and a memoir entitled The Gatekeeper. He is also the chair in English literature in Lancaster University's department of English and creative writing.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Library Journal Review

Although not a history of aesthetics, Eagleton's new book traces the relationship between aesthetics and political interests from the Enlightenment through post-modernism, aiming at a Marxist philosophy of the body. While starting with Shaftesbury, Hume, and Burke, he is primarily concerned with the contribution of the German philosophical tradition. He is especially interested in the Hegelians from Hegel and Marx to Benjamin, Adorno, and Habermas, and the anti-Hegelians from Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche to Heidegger and Foucault. As with his many earlier books on literary theory and Marxist aesthetics (e.g., Literary Theory , LJ 8/83), Eagleton's new volume is marked both by its clarity and its commitment.--T.L. Cooksey, Armstrong State Coll., Savannah, Ga. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Eagleton succeeds brilliantly in situating aesthetic theory as an irreducibly heterogeneous series of discourses whose ideological and political effect on North Atlantic civilization since the Enlightenment has been more diverse and consequential than traditional philosophical, literary, and cultural theory had previously suspected or acknowledged. Aesthetics is the vehicle for both the liberating emergence of bourgeois individualism and the ideological domination of bourgeois class interests. Eagleton's greatest achievement in the present book, his most significant to date, is to have differentiated these conflicting elements within a forbiddingly difficult array of texts from Hume and Kant to Lyotard and Habermas. Although aesthetics can give voice to bodily experience, judgment, and taste, it can also serve as the coercive medium in which those experiences are intercepted and overtaken by ideological currents that disguise rather than reveal the particularity of subject/object relations. Marx becomes Eagleton's consummate theorist of aesthetic ideology because Marx recognized that the Kantian sensus communis was set in motion by the commodity form, that the objective content of subjective experience is determined by market forces, and that the critique of aesthetic ideology is fundamental to a theory of society. A stimulating combination of close argument and pertinent historical generalization, which will prove immensely helpful in leading students and specialists toward more exacting readings of both the philosophical texts and the social structures in which they emerged. N. Lukacher University of Illinois at Chicago


Library Journal Review

Although not a history of aesthetics, Eagleton's new book traces the relationship between aesthetics and political interests from the Enlightenment through post-modernism, aiming at a Marxist philosophy of the body. While starting with Shaftesbury, Hume, and Burke, he is primarily concerned with the contribution of the German philosophical tradition. He is especially interested in the Hegelians from Hegel and Marx to Benjamin, Adorno, and Habermas, and the anti-Hegelians from Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche to Heidegger and Foucault. As with his many earlier books on literary theory and Marxist aesthetics (e.g., Literary Theory , LJ 8/83), Eagleton's new volume is marked both by its clarity and its commitment.--T.L. Cooksey, Armstrong State Coll., Savannah, Ga. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Eagleton succeeds brilliantly in situating aesthetic theory as an irreducibly heterogeneous series of discourses whose ideological and political effect on North Atlantic civilization since the Enlightenment has been more diverse and consequential than traditional philosophical, literary, and cultural theory had previously suspected or acknowledged. Aesthetics is the vehicle for both the liberating emergence of bourgeois individualism and the ideological domination of bourgeois class interests. Eagleton's greatest achievement in the present book, his most significant to date, is to have differentiated these conflicting elements within a forbiddingly difficult array of texts from Hume and Kant to Lyotard and Habermas. Although aesthetics can give voice to bodily experience, judgment, and taste, it can also serve as the coercive medium in which those experiences are intercepted and overtaken by ideological currents that disguise rather than reveal the particularity of subject/object relations. Marx becomes Eagleton's consummate theorist of aesthetic ideology because Marx recognized that the Kantian sensus communis was set in motion by the commodity form, that the objective content of subjective experience is determined by market forces, and that the critique of aesthetic ideology is fundamental to a theory of society. A stimulating combination of close argument and pertinent historical generalization, which will prove immensely helpful in leading students and specialists toward more exacting readings of both the philosophical texts and the social structures in which they emerged. N. Lukacher University of Illinois at Chicago


Table of Contents

Introduction
1 Free Particulars
2 The Law of the HeartShaftesbury and Hume and Burke
3 The Kantian Imaginary
4 Schiller and Hegemony
5 The World as ArtefactFichte and Schelling and Hegel
6 The Death of DesireArthur Schopenhauer
7 Absolutte IroniesSren Kierkegaard
8 The Marxist Sublime
9 True IllusionsFriedrich Nietzshe
10 The Name of the FatherSigmund Freud
11 The Politics of BeingMartin Heidegger
12 The Marxist RabbiWalter Benjamin
13 Art After AuschwitzTheodor Adorno
14 From the Polis to Postmodernism
Index
Introduction
1 Free Particulars
2 The Law of the HeartShaftesbury and Hume and Burke
3 The Kantian Imaginary
4 Schiller and Hegemony
5 The World as ArtefactFichte and Schelling and Hegel
6 The Death of DesireArthur Schopenhauer
7 Absolutte IroniesSren Kierkegaard
8 The Marxist Sublime
9 True IllusionsFriedrich Nietzshe
10 The Name of the FatherSigmund Freud
11 The Politics of BeingMartin Heidegger
12 The Marxist RabbiWalter Benjamin
13 Art After AuschwitzTheodor Adorno
14 From the Polis to Postmodernism
Index

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