Cover image for The credit card industry : a history
Title:
The credit card industry : a history
Author:
Mandell, Lewis.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boston : Twayne Publishers, 1990.
Physical Description:
xxiv, 176 pages ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780805798104

9780805798166
Format :
Book

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HG3756.U54 M25 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

A short, comprehensive, accessible (no source citations) chronicle of the entrepreneurialism, the changing technology, the evolving structure, and the competitive and regulatory dimensions of the credit card's proliferation. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR


Summary

A short, comprehensive, accessible (no source citations) chronicle of the entrepreneurialism, the changing technology, the evolving structure, and the competitive and regulatory dimensions of the credit card's proliferation. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

From a professor of finance, a solid and accessible introduction to the history of credit-card usage. As Mandell points out, paying with plastic is ubiquitous these days, accounting for 12.6 percent of all goods and services in the U.S. alone. The modern credit card was born when the Diners Club was formed in 1949; the gasoline and airline industries picked up the concept, followed by the retail business and banks. Marketing techniques and governmental regulations are all part of the general yet comprehensive picture Mandell paints of a factor of commercial life he forecasts as continuing to thrive far into the future. Bibliography; to be indexed. --Brad Hooper


Choice Review

An interesting descriptive history of the entrepreneurial strategies, technological breakthroughs, and competitive structure of the credit card industry. In the post-WWII era, billions of credit cards have redefined the way consumers and merchants around the world do business. Despite the worldwide proliferation of credit cards, its impact is most noticeable in the US where a majority of families carry several cards and where in 1988 they charged a remarkable 12.6 of aggregate consumer spending. Though the concept of credit is hardly new, the social and economic consequences of its most modern incarnation, the credit card, is an intriguing story. Mandell has written a through analysis of the conditions and circumstances that led to creation of the credit card industry; the legal and operational problems in the evolution of that industry; as well as the technological innovations and battles that were and continue to be waged over the nature and function of the cards themselves. His study concludes with a very useful chronology, bibliographic essay, and selected bibliography. Recommended for general readers, undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty. T. E. Sullivan Towson State University


Booklist Review

From a professor of finance, a solid and accessible introduction to the history of credit-card usage. As Mandell points out, paying with plastic is ubiquitous these days, accounting for 12.6 percent of all goods and services in the U.S. alone. The modern credit card was born when the Diners Club was formed in 1949; the gasoline and airline industries picked up the concept, followed by the retail business and banks. Marketing techniques and governmental regulations are all part of the general yet comprehensive picture Mandell paints of a factor of commercial life he forecasts as continuing to thrive far into the future. Bibliography; to be indexed. --Brad Hooper


Choice Review

An interesting descriptive history of the entrepreneurial strategies, technological breakthroughs, and competitive structure of the credit card industry. In the post-WWII era, billions of credit cards have redefined the way consumers and merchants around the world do business. Despite the worldwide proliferation of credit cards, its impact is most noticeable in the US where a majority of families carry several cards and where in 1988 they charged a remarkable 12.6 of aggregate consumer spending. Though the concept of credit is hardly new, the social and economic consequences of its most modern incarnation, the credit card, is an intriguing story. Mandell has written a through analysis of the conditions and circumstances that led to creation of the credit card industry; the legal and operational problems in the evolution of that industry; as well as the technological innovations and battles that were and continue to be waged over the nature and function of the cards themselves. His study concludes with a very useful chronology, bibliographic essay, and selected bibliography. Recommended for general readers, undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty. T. E. Sullivan Towson State University