Cover image for Good King Wenceslas
Title:
Good King Wenceslas
Author:
Wallner, John, 1945-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Philomel Books, 1990.
Physical Description:
29 unnumbered pages ; 23 cm
Summary:
A retelling of the old song of the good king, who went out into the countryside at Christmas time to share with the poor. Includes music.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780399216206
Format :
Book

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PZ8.3.W164 GO 1990 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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Summary

Summary

A retelling of the old song of the good king, who went out into the countryside at Christmas time to share with the poor. Includes music.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Ages 5-8. This picture-book version of the familiar English Christmas carol describes how the good king and his page left their comforts on a cold, snowy night to take food, wine, and firewood to an old peasant. The main events proceed purposefully across double-page spreads, while pleasing vignettes of court and peasant life and a fox-and-rabbit chase appear as counterpoint. In the final scene, the fox lies down with the rabbit, Wenceslas and the poor man bless each other, and contentment fills every corner of the peaceable kingdom. Wallner's artwork expresses the story and meaning of the carol in well-designed scenes, making it especially easy to think of the carol as the accompaniment for a medieval dance. His Breughel-like figures perfectly capture the staid gaiety of the tune and echo the underlying music through repetition of forms within the compositions and the use of dancing figures in many background scenes. The music is appended. For libraries seeking picture-book interpretations of carols, here's a gem. ~--Carolyn Phelan


School Library Journal Review

A boyish King Wenceslas makes his way through a mountainous fairytale setting during a winter storm to help a peasant home in this traditional song. Wallner's watercolor renderings of people are anatomically exaggerated, giving the characters a grotesque appearance. Hinterly's version (Dutton, 1988) is warmer and less busy. Both include music and words. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.