Cover image for A hippopotamusn't and other animal verses
Title:
A hippopotamusn't and other animal verses
Author:
Lewis, J. Patrick.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Dial Books for Young Readers, 1990.
Physical Description:
36 unnumbered pages ; 22 cm
Summary:
More than thirty mostly humorous poems about a variety of animals.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780803705180

9780803705197
Format :
Book

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PS3562.E9465 H56 1990 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PS3562.E9465 H56 1990 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

More than thirty mostly humorous poems about a variety of animals.


Summary

More than thirty mostly humorous poems about a variety of animals.


Author Notes

J. Patrick Lewis was born on May 5, 1942. He is a poet and prose writer who is known for his children's poems. He worked as a professor of economics before devoting himself full-time to writing in 1998. He is the author of 90 children's books including: BoshBlobberBosh, Please Bury Me in the Library, A Hippopotamusn't, First Dog, Spot the Plot, The House, and The National Geographic Book of Animal Poetry. In 2014, his title Voices from the March on Washington, made the Hot Civil Rights Titles List.

He has received many awards from the American Library Association, The Golden Kite Award from the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators, the Claudia Lewis Award from The Bank Street School and others. He also received the 2010-11 National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Excellence in Children's Poetry Award. He was also named the third, U.S. Children's Poet Laureate for 2011-2013 by the Poetry Foundation in Chicago.

(Bowker Author Biography)


J. Patrick Lewis was born on May 5, 1942. He is a poet and prose writer who is known for his children's poems. He worked as a professor of economics before devoting himself full-time to writing in 1998. He is the author of 90 children's books including: BoshBlobberBosh, Please Bury Me in the Library, A Hippopotamusn't, First Dog, Spot the Plot, The House, and The National Geographic Book of Animal Poetry. In 2014, his title Voices from the March on Washington, made the Hot Civil Rights Titles List.

He has received many awards from the American Library Association, The Golden Kite Award from the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators, the Claudia Lewis Award from The Bank Street School and others. He also received the 2010-11 National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Excellence in Children's Poetry Award. He was also named the third, U.S. Children's Poet Laureate for 2011-2013 by the Poetry Foundation in Chicago.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Publisher's Weekly Review

While some of Lewis's animal verses are perhaps more successful than others, all are brimming with puns and good fun. The donkey, for example, ``is an ani-mule / Who won't put up with ridi-cule'' and although Tom Tigercat ``is noted / for his manners and his wit. / He wouldn't think of lion, / no, he doesn't cheetah bit.'' Unlike Jeanne Steig's Consider the Lemming , the emphasis here is not on characterization but on the joyful exhuberance with which Lewis ( The Tsar and the Amazing Cow ) embraces and stretches language--reminiscent of Ogden Nash. Chess ( Tommy at the Grocery Store ) contributes her distinctive, wittily drawn animals that cavort and grin from every page. The hippopotamus flosses between his huge teeth; a farmer, his wife and their dog share a vision of a roasted chicken as a blue-tailed cock ambles by. From the owl's ``mouse-mad night'' to the kimono-clad ``very first Rhino (from Tokyo)'' who reposes under cherry blossoms telling ``joke after jokeo,'' this successful collaboration is very merry. Ages 4-8. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 5-- A parade of animals, insects, and birds--tomcat, pelican, flamingo, turkey, slug--march through these 35 delightful poems--one per page. With a sense of poetic humor reminiscent of the work of X. J. Kennedy, Lewis offers lines that are generously descriptive in an amusing way: a tomcat is ``The bird-watching bandit/ On needle-point claws/ The chief of detectives/On marshmallow paws''; a flamingo is a ``long/ cooooooooool drink/ of something pink''; a robin is ``ready/ to play tug-of-worm.'' Lewis reflects on the poses of a giraffe taking a drink, a praying mantis eating, and on the electrifying habits of an eel. These poems will excite young readers with their freshness and perhaps ignite their own creativity as well. The illustrations have a humor all their own. Many of the creatures (and the people) have the wide-eyed zany appearance that is so characteristic of Chess' work. Her animals range from cartoonlike to stylized--all done in strikingly detailed full-color tempera paint, colored pencil, pastels, and pen-and-ink. An entertaining collection of poems, cleverly illustrated. --Susan Scheps, Shaker Heights Public Library, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

While some of Lewis's animal verses are perhaps more successful than others, all are brimming with puns and good fun. The donkey, for example, ``is an ani-mule / Who won't put up with ridi-cule'' and although Tom Tigercat ``is noted / for his manners and his wit. / He wouldn't think of lion, / no, he doesn't cheetah bit.'' Unlike Jeanne Steig's Consider the Lemming , the emphasis here is not on characterization but on the joyful exhuberance with which Lewis ( The Tsar and the Amazing Cow ) embraces and stretches language--reminiscent of Ogden Nash. Chess ( Tommy at the Grocery Store ) contributes her distinctive, wittily drawn animals that cavort and grin from every page. The hippopotamus flosses between his huge teeth; a farmer, his wife and their dog share a vision of a roasted chicken as a blue-tailed cock ambles by. From the owl's ``mouse-mad night'' to the kimono-clad ``very first Rhino (from Tokyo)'' who reposes under cherry blossoms telling ``joke after jokeo,'' this successful collaboration is very merry. Ages 4-8. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 5-- A parade of animals, insects, and birds--tomcat, pelican, flamingo, turkey, slug--march through these 35 delightful poems--one per page. With a sense of poetic humor reminiscent of the work of X. J. Kennedy, Lewis offers lines that are generously descriptive in an amusing way: a tomcat is ``The bird-watching bandit/ On needle-point claws/ The chief of detectives/On marshmallow paws''; a flamingo is a ``long/ cooooooooool drink/ of something pink''; a robin is ``ready/ to play tug-of-worm.'' Lewis reflects on the poses of a giraffe taking a drink, a praying mantis eating, and on the electrifying habits of an eel. These poems will excite young readers with their freshness and perhaps ignite their own creativity as well. The illustrations have a humor all their own. Many of the creatures (and the people) have the wide-eyed zany appearance that is so characteristic of Chess' work. Her animals range from cartoonlike to stylized--all done in strikingly detailed full-color tempera paint, colored pencil, pastels, and pen-and-ink. An entertaining collection of poems, cleverly illustrated. --Susan Scheps, Shaker Heights Public Library, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.