Cover image for How a house is built
Title:
How a house is built
Author:
Gibbons, Gail.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Holiday House, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
30 unnumbered pages ; 22 cm
Summary:
Describes how the surveyor, heavy machinery operators, carpenter crew, plumbers, and other workers build a house.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 570 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.7 0.5 51284.

Reading Counts RC K-2 3.1 2 Quiz: 05399 Guided reading level: M.
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780823408412
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Call Number
Material Type
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Status
Newstead Library TH4811.5 .G53 1990 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clarence Library TH4811.5 .G53 1990 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Elma Library TH4811.5 .G53 1990 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Grand Island Library TH4811.5 .G53 1990 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Kenmore Library TH4811.5 .G53 1990 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Orchard Park Library TH4811.5 .G53 1990 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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City of Tonawanda Library TH4811.5 .G53 1990 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Audubon Library TH4811.5 .G53 1990 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

From the architect's plans to the landscaping.


Author Notes

Gail Gibbons was born in 1944 in Oak Park, Illinois. She received a degree in graphic design from the University of Illinois. She got a job doing artwork for television shows in New York City. She was eventually offered a job creating art for a children's show, where some of the children asked her if she had ever considered doing a children's books. Her first book, Willy and His Wheel Wagon, was published in 1975. Since then she has written and illustrated more than 170 non-fiction books for children including Nature's Green Umbrella: Tropical Rain Forests.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Ages 3-5. With her customary bright illustrations, Gibbons gives a fine introduction to the construction of a wood-frame house. After explaining the jobs of architect and general contractor, she pictures all the other specialists, from surveyor to landscaper. Succeeding pages show each of these workers in action, their labors described in clear, succinct captions. Construction machines and materials as well as parts of the house are identified, and each stage of construction logically follows the others. Workers are drawn in both sexes and several skin tones. Other forms of human shelter are briefly presented at the book's beginning and end. ~--Leone McDermott


School Library Journal Review

As readers quickly comprehend, building a house is a complex project requiring the cooperative efforts of many people. With her usual skill, Gibbons makes the process easy to understand. Beginning with the architect who draws the plans, readers meet the surveyors, equipment operators, carpenters, plumbers, and other people who produce a building. The book concludes with a family moving in, ready to make the house a home. Although children in some parts of the country will not relate specifically to houses with basements or septic systems, How a House Is Built provides basic, general information without oversimplifying. The illustrations are typical of Gibbons' style: bright colors, clean lines, and captions where necessary to define unfamiliar terms. Women are well represented in many non-traditional roles but not much racial diversity is shown. An appended page encourages comparison of modern frame houses to simple houses of the past. Building a House (Greenwillow, 1981) by Byron Barton offers less detailed information for younger children. --Jeanette Larson, Mesquite Pub . Lib . , TX (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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