Cover image for Moscow : treasures and traditions
Title:
Moscow : treasures and traditions
Author:
Allenov, M. M. (Mikhail Mikhaĭlovich)
Publication Information:
Washington, D.C. : Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service in association with University of Washington Press, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
281 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 30 cm
General Note:
"Published on the occasion of an exhibition organized by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service and the USSR Ministry of Culture in association with the Seattle Organizing Committee of the 1990 Goodwill Games and the Seattle Art Museum"--T.p. verso.

Exhibition shown at Seattle Art Museum from June through Sept. 1990 and at the Smithsonian Institution from Oct. 1990 through Feb. 1991.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780295969947

9780295969954
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library N6997.M7 M65 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

Surveys five hundred years of Russian arts and crafts.


Summary

Published in association with the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service on the occasion of a major exhibition, this beautiful volume reflects 500 years of Russian history through 12 essays and some 180 color photographs. Annotation(c) 2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

This book is a result of the traveling exhibition (produced by the Smithsonian Institution, the Ministry of Culture of the USSR, and museums of the Soviet Union) that brought to light 500 years of artwork hidden for much of this century. Wonderful color illustrations illuminate Russia's artistic roots in Moscow, tracing a history that extends from the middle ages through the rise of the aristocracy, the clash with Western culture, and the development of a democratic society within the city in this century. They also give a glimpse of everyday life in the capital through the eyes of artists. A general historical outline of Moscow and its arts is followed by detailed chapters on icons and ecclesiastical textiles, porcelains, painting, armor, metalwork, and much more. Notes, acknowledgments, list of rulers of Russia since 1462, catalog of the exhibition. ~--Cynthia Ogorek


Publisher's Weekly Review

The richness of Moscow's artistic legacy and the effects of various political, social and religious changes on the city's creative climate over the past 500 years are recorded here in 12 insightful essays by American and Soviet curators and academics, and in more than 180 brilliant color photographs and illustrations. Lincoln chronicles the capital's cultural heritage from the 1300s, when Moscow's princes appropriated art belonging to formerly independent territories as a symbol of the city's burgeoning political power. Olga G. Gordeeva examines the influence of European and Oriental styles on the traditional clothing of Moscow. The most interesting essay is John E. Bowlt's piece on Russian art from 1910--when a group of artists including Kandinsky and Malevich began to apply radically new concepts like neoprimitivism to their work--until the present, when artists are allowed to shun the socialist realist method that had been forced upon them for decades. Also included are essays on metalwork, jewelry, porcelain and armor. This book is being published in conjunction with a traveling exhibition organized by the Smithsonian Institution and the U.S.S.R. Ministry of Culture. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

This work presents a dozen essays (primarily by Russian authors) to accompany a traveling exhibition of 240 art works produced in Moscow in the last 500 years. Paintings and decorative arts--textiles, metalwork, armor--are dominant. Though they tend to be general and brief, the essays are informative and well written. Even with glasnost the tone is largely laudatory, and the exhibition appears to be an example of artistic diplomacy. There is no depth here for the specialist--the treatment of recent artistic developments is the weakest aspect--but the book offers the general reader an idea of art-making in Russia's greatest city.-- Jack Perry Brown, Ryerson & Burnham Libs., Art Inst. of Chicago (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

This book is a result of the traveling exhibition (produced by the Smithsonian Institution, the Ministry of Culture of the USSR, and museums of the Soviet Union) that brought to light 500 years of artwork hidden for much of this century. Wonderful color illustrations illuminate Russia's artistic roots in Moscow, tracing a history that extends from the middle ages through the rise of the aristocracy, the clash with Western culture, and the development of a democratic society within the city in this century. They also give a glimpse of everyday life in the capital through the eyes of artists. A general historical outline of Moscow and its arts is followed by detailed chapters on icons and ecclesiastical textiles, porcelains, painting, armor, metalwork, and much more. Notes, acknowledgments, list of rulers of Russia since 1462, catalog of the exhibition. ~--Cynthia Ogorek


Publisher's Weekly Review

The richness of Moscow's artistic legacy and the effects of various political, social and religious changes on the city's creative climate over the past 500 years are recorded here in 12 insightful essays by American and Soviet curators and academics, and in more than 180 brilliant color photographs and illustrations. Lincoln chronicles the capital's cultural heritage from the 1300s, when Moscow's princes appropriated art belonging to formerly independent territories as a symbol of the city's burgeoning political power. Olga G. Gordeeva examines the influence of European and Oriental styles on the traditional clothing of Moscow. The most interesting essay is John E. Bowlt's piece on Russian art from 1910--when a group of artists including Kandinsky and Malevich began to apply radically new concepts like neoprimitivism to their work--until the present, when artists are allowed to shun the socialist realist method that had been forced upon them for decades. Also included are essays on metalwork, jewelry, porcelain and armor. This book is being published in conjunction with a traveling exhibition organized by the Smithsonian Institution and the U.S.S.R. Ministry of Culture. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

This work presents a dozen essays (primarily by Russian authors) to accompany a traveling exhibition of 240 art works produced in Moscow in the last 500 years. Paintings and decorative arts--textiles, metalwork, armor--are dominant. Though they tend to be general and brief, the essays are informative and well written. Even with glasnost the tone is largely laudatory, and the exhibition appears to be an example of artistic diplomacy. There is no depth here for the specialist--the treatment of recent artistic developments is the weakest aspect--but the book offers the general reader an idea of art-making in Russia's greatest city.-- Jack Perry Brown, Ryerson & Burnham Libs., Art Inst. of Chicago (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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