Cover image for Justice delayed : the record of the Japanese American internment cases
Title:
Justice delayed : the record of the Japanese American internment cases
Author:
Irons, Peter H., 1940-
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Middleton, Conn. : Wesleyan University Press, 1989.
Physical Description:
xi, 436 pages ; 25 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780819551689

9780819561756
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library KF7224.5 .J87 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Summary

Summary

This book documents the reopening of the World War II Japanese American internment cases. Included are the full texts of the U.S. Supreme Court decisions of the 1940s and the documents related to the vindication effort of the 1980s.


Summary

Details the case of Fred Koremsatsu, a Japanese American arrested in 1942 because of his Japanese ancestry, who in 1982 launched a legal battle to clear his record.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

This is an important book; unfortunately, it is unlikely to attract the wide audience that it warrants. The forced relocation and internment of Japanese Americans during WW II constitutes an unprecedented abrogation of their civil rights; yet only three Japanese Americans legally challenged the initial curfew and exclusion orders. Unsuccessful at the time, Minoro Yasui, Gordon Hirabayashi, and Fred Korematsu never abandoned their efforts to have their convictions vacated and their names cleared. Irons, an academic as well as a lawyer, who uncovered the evidence that allowed the case to be reopened in 1983, has compiled a fascinating and compelling account of their ultimate triumph. Never before had convictions that had been sustained in the US Supreme Court been challenged and overturned. Iron's introduction provides instructive background to the cases as well as an essential guide to the labyrinthine judicial process through which the defendants had to journey. But it is the documents themselves that make this volume such a valuable resource--for the teacher, the student, and the general reader. They demonstrate not only that the US government failed to protect the civil liberties of its citizens, but also that it suppressed evidence and lied in order to justify its behavior. While the media have focused on the issue of compensating those Japanese Americans who suffered, underscoring the millions of dollars involved, little attention, prior to this volume, has been paid to the fundamental constitutional issues. Undergraduates, graduate students, and general readers. R. H. Immerman University of Hawaii at Manoa


Choice Review

This is an important book; unfortunately, it is unlikely to attract the wide audience that it warrants. The forced relocation and internment of Japanese Americans during WW II constitutes an unprecedented abrogation of their civil rights; yet only three Japanese Americans legally challenged the initial curfew and exclusion orders. Unsuccessful at the time, Minoro Yasui, Gordon Hirabayashi, and Fred Korematsu never abandoned their efforts to have their convictions vacated and their names cleared. Irons, an academic as well as a lawyer, who uncovered the evidence that allowed the case to be reopened in 1983, has compiled a fascinating and compelling account of their ultimate triumph. Never before had convictions that had been sustained in the US Supreme Court been challenged and overturned. Iron's introduction provides instructive background to the cases as well as an essential guide to the labyrinthine judicial process through which the defendants had to journey. But it is the documents themselves that make this volume such a valuable resource--for the teacher, the student, and the general reader. They demonstrate not only that the US government failed to protect the civil liberties of its citizens, but also that it suppressed evidence and lied in order to justify its behavior. While the media have focused on the issue of compensating those Japanese Americans who suffered, underscoring the millions of dollars involved, little attention, prior to this volume, has been paid to the fundamental constitutional issues. Undergraduates, graduate students, and general readers. R. H. Immerman University of Hawaii at Manoa


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