Cover image for Buck fever : the deer hunting tradition in Pennsylvania
Title:
Buck fever : the deer hunting tradition in Pennsylvania
Author:
Sajna, Mike.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Pittsburgh, Pa. : University of Pittsburgh Press, 1990.
Physical Description:
x, 231 pages ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780822936459

9780822954361
Format :
Book

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SK301 .S217 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Every fall close to one million hunters enter Pennsylvania's forests and mountains in quest of the white-tailed deer. Some are seeking sport and companionship; others are stocking their larders for winter; many are conservationists who regard hunting as the most humane way of reducing overpopulated deer herds. They all face the increasing activism of animal rights advocates who are opposed to hunting in principle and who frequently picket and harass hunters.

This controversial subject is explored in depth by Mike Sajna, the outdoors columnist for Pittsburgh Magazine and a twenty-year veteran of Pennsylvania's "pumpkin army," the orange-clad throng that invades the woods every season. To explain the ethos and traditions of hunting he takes the reader to a typical deer camp in Warren County, in the rugged terrain of the Allegheny High Plateau. Starting with the trek north from their homes around Pittsburgh, he captures the sights and sounds, thoughts and feelings of three generations of hunters. With humor, affection, and insight he recounts the hunting lore, the camaraderie, the physical testing that make deer camp a unique experience.


Author Notes

Mike Sajna is the outdoors writer for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette , and has contributed numerous articles to regional and national magazines including Pennsylvania Angler and Boater, Pennsylvania Game News and Fly Rod and Reel . He is the author of Pennsylvania Trout and Salmon Fishing Guide; Buck Fever: The Deer Hunting Tradition in Pennsylvania; and The Allegheny River.


Reviews 4

Publisher's Weekly Review

You can almost smell the bacon frying in Sajna's ( Pennsylvania Trout and Salmon Fishing Guide ) account of a buck season in Pennsylvania's Allegheny mountains. The book weaves one hunting trip with a large dose of well-researched history. The chapters on history and tradition provide a solid context for the narrative of the hunt. In turn, the narrative often gives a welcome break from sometimes burdensome facts and statistics although the plethora of g vignettes risks turning the work into a scattershot blast of reminiscences, polemics and numbers. Nevertheless, there are plenty of interesting pellets of information that strike the mark: pioneers indirectly used wolves to hunt deer, spreading deer organs to entice wolves into scouting; Teddy Roosevelt and his son shot 468 game animals on safari in Africa at the same time Roosevelt was pushing for tough conservation laws at home; one 19th-century Pennsylvanian managed to kill 3000 deer. Highly recommended for hunters, but lay readers not turned off by descriptions of carcasses g will gain respect for the hunting tradition. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

There are one million deer hunters in Pennsylvania alone. Conscious of the strong emotions aroused by hunting, reporter and hunter Sajna describes one deer camp during one season to portray the complexity of the hunting experience. Alternate chapters relate the history of deer hunting from pioneer days to today's highly managed scene. The camaraderie of going Up North, the knowledge passed from father to son, and the environmental awareness all make the quality of the hunt more important than the size of the deer. The experience becomes a place and time where ``the world turned right again.'' Like James Kilgo's Deep Enough for Ivo rybills (Algonquin, 1988), this is a thoughtful look at the heritage of one's own territory. It should appeal to hunters everywhere and to those curious about hunting's appeal.-- Roland Person, Southern Illinois Univ. Lib., Carbondale (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

You can almost smell the bacon frying in Sajna's ( Pennsylvania Trout and Salmon Fishing Guide ) account of a buck season in Pennsylvania's Allegheny mountains. The book weaves one hunting trip with a large dose of well-researched history. The chapters on history and tradition provide a solid context for the narrative of the hunt. In turn, the narrative often gives a welcome break from sometimes burdensome facts and statistics although the plethora of g vignettes risks turning the work into a scattershot blast of reminiscences, polemics and numbers. Nevertheless, there are plenty of interesting pellets of information that strike the mark: pioneers indirectly used wolves to hunt deer, spreading deer organs to entice wolves into scouting; Teddy Roosevelt and his son shot 468 game animals on safari in Africa at the same time Roosevelt was pushing for tough conservation laws at home; one 19th-century Pennsylvanian managed to kill 3000 deer. Highly recommended for hunters, but lay readers not turned off by descriptions of carcasses g will gain respect for the hunting tradition. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

There are one million deer hunters in Pennsylvania alone. Conscious of the strong emotions aroused by hunting, reporter and hunter Sajna describes one deer camp during one season to portray the complexity of the hunting experience. Alternate chapters relate the history of deer hunting from pioneer days to today's highly managed scene. The camaraderie of going Up North, the knowledge passed from father to son, and the environmental awareness all make the quality of the hunt more important than the size of the deer. The experience becomes a place and time where ``the world turned right again.'' Like James Kilgo's Deep Enough for Ivo rybills (Algonquin, 1988), this is a thoughtful look at the heritage of one's own territory. It should appeal to hunters everywhere and to those curious about hunting's appeal.-- Roland Person, Southern Illinois Univ. Lib., Carbondale (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.