Cover image for Ancient Rome
Title:
Ancient Rome
Author:
James, Simon.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Knopf, 1990.
Physical Description:
64 pages ; 30 cm.
Summary:
A photo essay documenting ancient Rome and the people who lived there as revealed through the many artifacts they left behind, including shields, swords, tools, toys, cosmetics, and jewelry.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1070 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 8.1 2.0 17205.
ISBN:
9780679807414

9780679907411
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
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DG78 .J36 1990 Juvenile Non-Fiction Young Adult
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DG78 .J36 1990 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Full-color photos. "An excellent glossy catalogue of entertaining information about a civilization of antiquity. Family life, household effects, cosmetics, sports, children's dress and games--all these and more are on display in eye-filling spreads. Either read chronologically or browsed through, each page offers up a sterling visual feast guaranteed to spur discussion and provoke thinking about the early Romans."--Kirkus.  


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-7-This volume in the hybrid series focuses on life in ancient Rome as seen through the eyes of a family of Africans brought to the city as slaves. Most of the book is made up of DK's usual highly informative, well-illustrated factual descriptions. The edges of each spread tell the fictional story of the family in graphic-novel style. The nonfiction is engrossing, pulling readers into aspects of everyday life, with great cutaways of a variety of buildings and events. The story of a family torn apart, brought back together, and saved at the last moment is fairly unrealistic and unsatisfying compared to the great facts in the book. Readers seeking a graphic novel will be disappointed by the small part this format plays in the book. While overall it is an interesting combination that should appeal to reluctant readers, this title lacks the depth that most students will need for research purposes.-Dawn Rutherford, Kings County Library System, Bellevue, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

City-state to superpowerp. 6
The emperorsp. 8
The legionaryp. 10
Battle and defensep. 12
Soldiers in societyp. 14
Senators, citizens, subjects, and slavesp. 16
The women of Romep. 18
Growing upp. 20
Family lifep. 22
House and homep. 24
Builders and engineersp. 26
The bloody arenap. 28
Mortal combatp. 30
A day at the racesp. 34
The theaterp. 36
A trip to the bathsp. 38
Writing it all downp. 40
Craftsworkers and technologyp. 42
First catch your dormousep. 44
A dinner partyp. 46
Making musicp. 48
A world of many godsp. 50
Worship and sacrificep. 52
Healing the sickp. 54
Death and burialp. 56
Country lifep. 58
Transportation, travel, and tradep. 60
The twilight of Romep. 62
Indexp. 64