Cover image for A people's voice : Black South African writing in the twentieth century
Title:
A people's voice : Black South African writing in the twentieth century
Author:
Shava, Piniel Viriri.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
London : Zed Books ; Athens : Ohio University Press, 1989.
Physical Description:
179 pages ; 23 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780821409312

9780821409329
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PR9358.2.B57 S54 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

A comprehensive attempt to analyze and synthesize a wide range of South African literature in the 20th century. Shava (English, U. of Lesotho) grapples with the conflict between literary values and political goals. Printed in the UK on acidic paper (though the endpapers are acid-free). Paper edition (unseen), $12.95. Annotation(c) 2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)


Summary

A comprehensive attempt to analyze and synthesize a wide range of South African literature in the 20th century. Shava (English, U. of Lesotho) grapples with the conflict between literary values and political goals. Printed in the UK on acidic paper (though the endpapers are acid-free). Paper edition (unseen), $12.95. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR


Reviews 2

Choice Review

In a well-written and thoroughly documented survey of South African literature since WW II, Shava concentrates on the most widely known authors of the 50s, 60s, and 70s. The book's biggest problem, therefore, is that it does not live up to its title. It opens with an all-too-brief discussion of English-language literature during the first half of the 20th century and ends with a short section on post-Soweto literature, which turns into a discussion of Athol Fugard's recent plays. To its credit, the book clearly reveals the dynamic interaction between political action and literature in South Africa. It gives renewed voice to some of South Africa's finest writers, such as Peter Abrahams, Alex La Guma, and James Matthews. For the general reader it creates a vivid portrait of South African society during some of its most brutal years. For those who want more, it comes up a bit short. The most exciting parts of the book concern the rise of popular theater in the townships during the 1970s, and the radical poetry that grew out of the political activity of that period. At a time of great change in South Africa, this book helps us to understand the role played by African writers in the formation of that change. Appropriate for undergraduate, commumity college, and public libraries. C. Pike University of Minnesota


Choice Review

In a well-written and thoroughly documented survey of South African literature since WW II, Shava concentrates on the most widely known authors of the 50s, 60s, and 70s. The book's biggest problem, therefore, is that it does not live up to its title. It opens with an all-too-brief discussion of English-language literature during the first half of the 20th century and ends with a short section on post-Soweto literature, which turns into a discussion of Athol Fugard's recent plays. To its credit, the book clearly reveals the dynamic interaction between political action and literature in South Africa. It gives renewed voice to some of South Africa's finest writers, such as Peter Abrahams, Alex La Guma, and James Matthews. For the general reader it creates a vivid portrait of South African society during some of its most brutal years. For those who want more, it comes up a bit short. The most exciting parts of the book concern the rise of popular theater in the townships during the 1970s, and the radical poetry that grew out of the political activity of that period. At a time of great change in South Africa, this book helps us to understand the role played by African writers in the formation of that change. Appropriate for undergraduate, commumity college, and public libraries. C. Pike University of Minnesota


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