Cover image for Showa : the age of Hirohito
Title:
Showa : the age of Hirohito
Author:
Hoobler, Dorothy.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Walker, 1990.
Physical Description:
176 pages ; 24 cm
Summary:
A biography of the Japanese emperor who began his long reign as a divine ruler and, after the devastating defeat of World War II, accepted his new role as "symbol of the state" and watched over the re-birth of Japan as a leader in the world.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780802769664

9780802769671
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library DS889.8 .H66 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

A biography of the Japanese emperor who began his long reign as a divine ruler and, after the devastating defeat of World War II, accepted his new role as symbol of the state and watched over the re-birth of Japan as a leader in the world.


Summary

A biography of the Japanese emperor who began his long reign as a divine ruler and, after the devastating defeat of World War II, accepted his new role as "symbol of the state" and watched over the re-birth of Japan as a leader in the world.


Author Notes

Dorothy Hoobler is a historian and author of over sixty books, both fiction and nonfiction, mostly for young readers. Her and her husband are the authors of the well-loved American Family Album series, including The Japanese American Family Album, which was named a Carter G. Woodson Honor Book in 1997. The Hooblers won the Edgar Allan Poe Award for Best Young Adult Novel in 2005 with In Darkness, Death.

In addition, the Society for School Librarians International chose their book Showa: The Era of Hirohito for a best book award in 1991, and they have been cited for excellence by the Library of Congress, the Parents' Choice Foundation, Bank Street College, the International Reading Association, the National Conference of Christians and Jews, and the New York Public Library.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Dorothy Hoobler is a historian and author of over sixty books, both fiction and nonfiction, mostly for young readers. Her and her husband are the authors of the well-loved American Family Album series, including The Japanese American Family Album, which was named a Carter G. Woodson Honor Book in 1997. The Hooblers won the Edgar Allan Poe Award for Best Young Adult Novel in 2005 with In Darkness, Death.

In addition, the Society for School Librarians International chose their book Showa: The Era of Hirohito for a best book award in 1991, and they have been cited for excellence by the Library of Congress, the Parents' Choice Foundation, Bank Street College, the International Reading Association, the National Conference of Christians and Jews, and the New York Public Library.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 7-10. Hirohito came to the throne as a god-king. When he died some 70 years later, he was a constitutional monarch and a symbol of the great changes that took place during his reign. The name that he chose for his reign, Showa (enlightened peace), would eventually take on a bitter irony. During his rule, Japan experienced tremendous industrial-military growth, World War II, and unparalleled postwar economic growth. The Hooblers sensitively chronicle the emperor's life and times but are vague about his wartime role. Against his wishes, junior officers and key members of the army staff were responsible for striking China in 1931, yet he could not purge these elements without bringing their wrath upon himself. Although Hirohito never publicly acknowledged accountability, his signature appears on all the major documents that led Japan into the war. He was, nevertheless, effective in influencing the decision to surrender when many of the armed forces wanted to fight to the last man. Shy and retiring, the emperor is portrayed as a man foremostly concerned for the welfare of his people. ~Bibliography; to be indexed. --Morton Stern


School Library Journal Review

Gr 6-12-- Modern Japanese history is treated here using the Showa Emperor (Hirohito) as the focal point. The Hooblers commence with a precis of the opening of Japan by Perry and a brief sketch of the traditional Japanese imperial system and its transformation under the Meiji Emperor, Hirohito's grandfather. When Hirohito himself appears on the scene in 1901, readers are given an extremely balanced and carefully documented history of modern Japan along with his life story. It is as intimate as a portrait of this ruler can be, given his sequestered life and the secrecy of the Imperial Household Agency. The Hooblers point out the limitations of all biographies of this subject as the Japanese government has not and probably never will release Hirohito's diaries. This is a real crux considering that the most burning question of Hirohito's reign is exactly how involved he was in the military decisions and atrocities perpetrated in his name. Adult biographers have, until recently, tended to exonerate and absolve. This is a more balanced and documented approach, drawn from standard sources, all scrupulously listed in the bibliography and noted in the text. The result is an open-ended answer, yet the only possible fair one with the actual facts in hand. All is told economically with an eye for telling detail and with a fluid, absorbing style. There are errors, most notably using the term gata (a Tibetan scarf) for geta (Japanese wooden sandals). --John Philbrook, San Francisco Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 7-10. Hirohito came to the throne as a god-king. When he died some 70 years later, he was a constitutional monarch and a symbol of the great changes that took place during his reign. The name that he chose for his reign, Showa (enlightened peace), would eventually take on a bitter irony. During his rule, Japan experienced tremendous industrial-military growth, World War II, and unparalleled postwar economic growth. The Hooblers sensitively chronicle the emperor's life and times but are vague about his wartime role. Against his wishes, junior officers and key members of the army staff were responsible for striking China in 1931, yet he could not purge these elements without bringing their wrath upon himself. Although Hirohito never publicly acknowledged accountability, his signature appears on all the major documents that led Japan into the war. He was, nevertheless, effective in influencing the decision to surrender when many of the armed forces wanted to fight to the last man. Shy and retiring, the emperor is portrayed as a man foremostly concerned for the welfare of his people. ~Bibliography; to be indexed. --Morton Stern


School Library Journal Review

Gr 6-12-- Modern Japanese history is treated here using the Showa Emperor (Hirohito) as the focal point. The Hooblers commence with a precis of the opening of Japan by Perry and a brief sketch of the traditional Japanese imperial system and its transformation under the Meiji Emperor, Hirohito's grandfather. When Hirohito himself appears on the scene in 1901, readers are given an extremely balanced and carefully documented history of modern Japan along with his life story. It is as intimate as a portrait of this ruler can be, given his sequestered life and the secrecy of the Imperial Household Agency. The Hooblers point out the limitations of all biographies of this subject as the Japanese government has not and probably never will release Hirohito's diaries. This is a real crux considering that the most burning question of Hirohito's reign is exactly how involved he was in the military decisions and atrocities perpetrated in his name. Adult biographers have, until recently, tended to exonerate and absolve. This is a more balanced and documented approach, drawn from standard sources, all scrupulously listed in the bibliography and noted in the text. The result is an open-ended answer, yet the only possible fair one with the actual facts in hand. All is told economically with an eye for telling detail and with a fluid, absorbing style. There are errors, most notably using the term gata (a Tibetan scarf) for geta (Japanese wooden sandals). --John Philbrook, San Francisco Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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