Cover image for The same sea as every summer
Title:
The same sea as every summer
Author:
Tusquets, Esther.
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Mismo mar de todos los veranos. English
Publication Information:
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, [1990]

©1990
General Note:
Translation of: El mismo mar de todos los veranos.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780803244221

9780803294165
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Central Library FICTION Adult Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Poetic and erotic, El mismo mar de todos los veranos ( The Same Sea As Every Summer ) was originally published in Spain in 1978, three years after the death of Franco and in the same year that government censorship was abolished. But even in a new era that fostered more liberal attitudes toward divorce, homosexuality, and women's rights, this novel by Esther Tusquets was controversial. Its feminine view of sexuality--in particular, its depiction of a lesbian relationship--was unprecedented in Spanish fiction. Now its complex moods and rhythms have been caught in an English translation by Margaret E. W. Jones that has won the Kayden National Translation Award.

The disillusioned narrator of The Same Sea As Every Summer is a middle-aged woman whose unhappy life prompts a journey into she past to rediscover a more authentic self. However, events force her to realize that love or trust will inevitably be repaid by betrayal. This pattern assumes various forms in a story that moves forward as well as backward, playing out in Barcelona among the haute bourgeoisie. Richly textured with allusion, The Same Sea As Every Summer is also a commentary on post-Civil War Spanish society by an author who grew up during the repressive Franco regime. Esther Tusquets's other novels include El amor es un juego solitano (1979) and Para no volver (1985).


Summary

Poetic and erotic, El mismo mar de todos los veranos ( The Same Sea As Every Summer ) was originally published in Spain in 1978, three years after the death of Franco and in the same year that government censorship was abolished. But even in a new era that fostered more liberal attitudes toward divorce, homosexuality, and women's rights, this novel by Esther Tusquets was controversial. Its feminine view of sexuality--in particular, its depiction of a lesbian relationship--was unprecedented in Spanish fiction. Now its complex moods and rhythms have been caught in an English translation by Margaret E. W. Jones that has won the Kayden National Translation Award.

The disillusioned narrator of The Same Sea As Every Summer is a middle-aged woman whose unhappy life prompts a journey into she past to rediscover a more authentic self. However, events force her to realize that love or trust will inevitably be repaid by betrayal. This pattern assumes various forms in a story that moves forward as well as backward, playing out in Barcelona among the haute bourgeoisie. Richly textured with allusion, The Same Sea As Every Summer is also a commentary on post-Civil War Spanish society by an author who grew up during the repressive Franco regime. Esther Tusquets's other novels include El amor es un juego solitano (1979) and Para no volver (1985).


Author Notes

Margaret E. W. Jones is a professor of Spanish at the University of Kentucky and the author of The Literary World of Ana Maria Matute (1970) , The contemporary Spanish Novel, 1939--1975 (1985) , and other critical works on contemporary Spanish literature.


Margaret E. W. Jones is a professor of Spanish at the University of Kentucky and the author of The Literary World of Ana Maria Matute (1970) , The contemporary Spanish Novel, 1939-1975 (1985) , and other critical works on contemporary Spanish literature.


Reviews 3

Library Journal Review

This novel was first published in 1978, just as Spain was emerging from the 36-year stranglehold of Franco. Since then, Tusquets (born 1936) has written three novels, all involving crisis-ridden women striving to refocus. Uncomfortable as a servile daughter, wife, and mother , and now betrayed by her husband as Ariadne was betrayed by Theseus, our narrator rejects her painful present by seeking out her past. She is aided by Clara, whose New World origins imply lushness and rebirth and whose traits easily recall incidents from the narrator's past. Their love affair spans 27 days. Which of the two, the narrator or the octopus-like Clara, is Beauty and which the Beast? Can there be a Happy Ending? This complex experimental work, with its metaphors from fairy tales and myths and its sentences of Faulknerian convolution, is challenging but worth the effort for its insights on so many levels.-- Jack Shreve, Allegany Community Coll., Cumberland, Md. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

A first-person, present-tense narrative of a woman, about age 50, who is a university professor of Italian literature. Though born into the bourgeoisie of her city (probably Barcelona), she has always been in conflict with the values and activities of her family and class. A man named Jorge, who came into her life when she was young and who has been everything her family and class were not, has inexplicably committed suicide, and the narrator/protagonist loses the will to continue the liberating path he set her upon. For 30 years hers is the loneliness of one whose mother, daughter, and successful husband neither care for nor understand her. After a crisis in her life, she seems to be on the verge of a new liberation but discovers that her will for trying was lost 30 years before. This novel begins well, but it bogs down tremendously--a rather common development in the Spanish feminist novel of the late '70s and early '80s. Regardless of its literary merits, however, it is an important cultural document. A volume in the "Nebraska European Women Series," it could be of interest to anyone reading in or studing contemporary feminism; and because it is by a major contemporary Spanish writer, it is recommended for purchase by academic and public libraries. Jones's translation from the Spanish serves well to bring Tusquets to the English-speaking general reader. S. Miller Texas A & M University


Choice Review

A first-person, present-tense narrative of a woman, about age 50, who is a university professor of Italian literature. Though born into the bourgeoisie of her city (probably Barcelona), she has always been in conflict with the values and activities of her family and class. A man named Jorge, who came into her life when she was young and who has been everything her family and class were not, has inexplicably committed suicide, and the narrator/protagonist loses the will to continue the liberating path he set her upon. For 30 years hers is the loneliness of one whose mother, daughter, and successful husband neither care for nor understand her. After a crisis in her life, she seems to be on the verge of a new liberation but discovers that her will for trying was lost 30 years before. This novel begins well, but it bogs down tremendously--a rather common development in the Spanish feminist novel of the late '70s and early '80s. Regardless of its literary merits, however, it is an important cultural document. A volume in the "Nebraska European Women Series," it could be of interest to anyone reading in or studing contemporary feminism; and because it is by a major contemporary Spanish writer, it is recommended for purchase by academic and public libraries. Jones's translation from the Spanish serves well to bring Tusquets to the English-speaking general reader. S. Miller Texas A & M University


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