Cover image for A Charlie Brown Christmas
Title:
A Charlie Brown Christmas
Author:
Schulz, Charles M. (Charles Monroe), 1922-2000.
Publication Information:
New York : Golden Book ; Racine, Wis. : Western Pub. Co., [1988]

©1988
Physical Description:
36 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 26 cm.
Summary:
Surrounded by other kids with extremely commercial ideas about Christmas, Charlie Brown struggles to understand the true spirit of the holiday.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780307137234

9780307637239
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PIC BK. Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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Summary

Summary

"The beloved Peanuts holiday special about Charlie Brown, Linus, a sad Christmas tree that's rescued, and the meaning of Christmas first aired on television in the 1960s. This charming, full-color abri"


Summary

Surrounded by other kids with extremely commercial ideas about Christmas, Charlie Brown struggles to understand the true spirit of the holiday.


Author Notes

Charles Monroe Schulz, creator of the Peanuts comic strip, was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota on November 26, 1922. He started drawing at a young age, practicing with popular characters such as Popeye. When he was 15, one of his pictures appeared as an illustration in "Ripley's Believe It or Not!" He took a correspondence course with Art Instruction Inc., where he later taught, and served in the Army during World War II.

The Peanuts (originally called Li'l Folks, a name that was changed by the United Feature Syndicate) began syndication on October 2, 1950, when it appeared in seven newspapers. Schulz's work went on to become the most popular syndicated comic strip of all time, appearing in 2600 papers in 75 countries around the world. Schulz drew everyone of the more than 18,250 Peanuts strips himself and his contract stipulated that no one else would ever draw them.

Charlie Brown, Snoopy and the rest of the Peanuts Gang also appear in a number of television specials, the first of which was A Charlie Brown Christmas (1964), created with animator Bill Melendez. It is one of the most watched and best loved television shows in history and winner of an Emmy and a Peabody.

Charles Schulz has been inducted into the Cartoonists Hall of Fame and won numerous awards. He was given Reuben Awards by the National Cartoonists Society in 1955 and 1964, the Yale Humor Award (1956), the School Bell Award from the National Education Society (1960), and the Ordre des Artes et des Lettres from the French Ministry of Culture. In 1990, his work was shown at the Louvre.

Schulz retired after being diagnosed with colon cancer. The final daily Peanuts strip appeared in January 3, 2000 and the final Sunday strip, along with a letter of thanks to his editors and fans, appeared on February 13, 2000. Schulz died in his home in Santa Rosa, California on February 12, 2000 within hours of the publication of his farewell strip.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Charles Monroe Schulz, creator of the Peanuts comic strip, was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota on November 26, 1922. He started drawing at a young age, practicing with popular characters such as Popeye. When he was 15, one of his pictures appeared as an illustration in "Ripley's Believe It or Not!" He took a correspondence course with Art Instruction Inc., where he later taught, and served in the Army during World War II.

The Peanuts (originally called Li'l Folks, a name that was changed by the United Feature Syndicate) began syndication on October 2, 1950, when it appeared in seven newspapers. Schulz's work went on to become the most popular syndicated comic strip of all time, appearing in 2600 papers in 75 countries around the world. Schulz drew everyone of the more than 18,250 Peanuts strips himself and his contract stipulated that no one else would ever draw them.

Charlie Brown, Snoopy and the rest of the Peanuts Gang also appear in a number of television specials, the first of which was A Charlie Brown Christmas (1964), created with animator Bill Melendez. It is one of the most watched and best loved television shows in history and winner of an Emmy and a Peabody.

Charles Schulz has been inducted into the Cartoonists Hall of Fame and won numerous awards. He was given Reuben Awards by the National Cartoonists Society in 1955 and 1964, the Yale Humor Award (1956), the School Bell Award from the National Education Society (1960), and the Ordre des Artes et des Lettres from the French Ministry of Culture. In 1990, his work was shown at the Louvre.

Schulz retired after being diagnosed with colon cancer. The final daily Peanuts strip appeared in January 3, 2000 and the final Sunday strip, along with a letter of thanks to his editors and fans, appeared on February 13, 2000. Schulz died in his home in Santa Rosa, California on February 12, 2000 within hours of the publication of his farewell strip.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Publisher's Weekly Review

This abbreviated version of the holiday cartoon, beloved to nostalgic adults and kids alike, gets the pop-up treatment. All the key elements are here: Charlie Brown's rescue of the scraggliest tree on the lot; Linus's monologue about the true meaning of Christmas, and a closing chorus of "Hark the Herald Angels Sing." The paper construction (Snoopy sends Charlie Brown tumbling in an early scene; later, Charlie Brown spins as he calls for quiet on the set) is nifty, though matching the magic of the original is a tall order. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-On December 9, 1965, the animated special A Charlie Brown Christmas was originally aired on CBS, and a tradition was born. The book version of the story has been published many times over the last 50 years, with different authors taking on the challenge of adapting it to the page. This 50th anniversary edition presents a very streamlined tale, told in the present tense. Readers never find out, for example, that the play Charlie Brown is supposed to direct is a Nativity play. Still, the main points are all there-Snoopy's well-decorated dog house, little Sally's avaricious letter to Santa, Linus's brief but powerful reminder of the original Christmas story, and Charlie Brown's sad little tree, which becomes something special when the gang works together to decorate it. This paperback edition with glitter on the cover may not last for 50 years, but it hits the important notes and might do better with younger readers/listeners. VERDICT Buy a few extra copies of this perennial favorite.-Mara Alpert, Los Angeles Public Library © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

This abbreviated version of the holiday cartoon, beloved to nostalgic adults and kids alike, gets the pop-up treatment. All the key elements are here: Charlie Brown's rescue of the scraggliest tree on the lot; Linus's monologue about the true meaning of Christmas, and a closing chorus of "Hark the Herald Angels Sing." The paper construction (Snoopy sends Charlie Brown tumbling in an early scene; later, Charlie Brown spins as he calls for quiet on the set) is nifty, though matching the magic of the original is a tall order. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-On December 9, 1965, the animated special A Charlie Brown Christmas was originally aired on CBS, and a tradition was born. The book version of the story has been published many times over the last 50 years, with different authors taking on the challenge of adapting it to the page. This 50th anniversary edition presents a very streamlined tale, told in the present tense. Readers never find out, for example, that the play Charlie Brown is supposed to direct is a Nativity play. Still, the main points are all there-Snoopy's well-decorated dog house, little Sally's avaricious letter to Santa, Linus's brief but powerful reminder of the original Christmas story, and Charlie Brown's sad little tree, which becomes something special when the gang works together to decorate it. This paperback edition with glitter on the cover may not last for 50 years, but it hits the important notes and might do better with younger readers/listeners. VERDICT Buy a few extra copies of this perennial favorite.-Mara Alpert, Los Angeles Public Library © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.