Cover image for Morgan Russell
Title:
Morgan Russell
Author:
Kushner, Marilyn S., 1948-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Hudson Hills Press in association with the Montclair Art Museum : Distributed in the U.S., its territories and possessions ... by Rizzoli International Publications, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
221 pages : illustrations ; 31 cm
General Note:
"Published to accompany an exhibition organized by the Montclair Art Museum in association with the American Federation of Arts"--T.p. verso.
Language:
English
Added Corporate Author:
ISBN:
9781555950460

9781555950477
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library ND237.R754 A4 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize
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Reviews 4

Publisher's Weekly Review

Aided by monthly stipends from Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, Morgan Russell (1886-1953), a New Yorker working in Paris, pioneered the short-lived Synchromistok movement with his friend Stanton Macdonald-Wright. Their swirling discs of color--exploding spectrums abuzz with rhythm and movement--blazed an indelible impression on modernist abstraction. But Russell, a pupil of Matisse, finally reached an impasse with his ``Synchromies.'' He then sought inspiration in religion and classical music, but eventually retreated to a farm in the French countryside and shifted to a figurative style. His female nudes are mythic goddesses; his male nudes, inspired by heroic figures from Leonardo and Titian, are idiosyncratic, as are the later monumental figural and religious compositions. Kushner, a curator at the Montclair Art Museum, N.J., has penned an eye-opening monograph, scanning all facets of an artist who deserves to be better known. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Choice Review

This catalog is the first thorough assessment of the complete works of the early modernist artist Morgan Russell (1886-1953). Widely known in US art history, but only for his Synchronist abstractions of 1912-14 and c. 1922-23, Russell is now characterized as an avant-garde "representational artist who worked in an abstract manner for a few years." Today broader evaluation is made possible from the discovery of many new works, further utilization of the Russell Archives (now permanently in the Montclair Art Museum), and assistance from the artist's family. Observations are built upon earlier scholarship including that of William C. Agee, who contributes to this volume a short essay on the state of Russell studies. Russell emerges from this study as a curious individual. As is known, his abstract paintings often bore hidden encodings of human muscularity, with references to famous forms by Michelangelo. Later works seen in sequence for the first time here show eccentric visions either of posturing nudes (sometimes of ambiguous gender) couched as genii and goddesses, or as mannered figures acting out Christian subjects. His greatest strength remains always as a colorist; and while he will be remembered most for works in Synchronist style, his figural paintings--successful perhaps as kitsch when not considered seriously--do reflect the dauntlessness of one who worked so long in near poverty and virtual obscurity. Recommended for larger art collections. -M. Hamel-Schwulst, Towson State University


Publisher's Weekly Review

Aided by monthly stipends from Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, Morgan Russell (1886-1953), a New Yorker working in Paris, pioneered the short-lived Synchromistok movement with his friend Stanton Macdonald-Wright. Their swirling discs of color--exploding spectrums abuzz with rhythm and movement--blazed an indelible impression on modernist abstraction. But Russell, a pupil of Matisse, finally reached an impasse with his ``Synchromies.'' He then sought inspiration in religion and classical music, but eventually retreated to a farm in the French countryside and shifted to a figurative style. His female nudes are mythic goddesses; his male nudes, inspired by heroic figures from Leonardo and Titian, are idiosyncratic, as are the later monumental figural and religious compositions. Kushner, a curator at the Montclair Art Museum, N.J., has penned an eye-opening monograph, scanning all facets of an artist who deserves to be better known. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Choice Review

This catalog is the first thorough assessment of the complete works of the early modernist artist Morgan Russell (1886-1953). Widely known in US art history, but only for his Synchronist abstractions of 1912-14 and c. 1922-23, Russell is now characterized as an avant-garde "representational artist who worked in an abstract manner for a few years." Today broader evaluation is made possible from the discovery of many new works, further utilization of the Russell Archives (now permanently in the Montclair Art Museum), and assistance from the artist's family. Observations are built upon earlier scholarship including that of William C. Agee, who contributes to this volume a short essay on the state of Russell studies. Russell emerges from this study as a curious individual. As is known, his abstract paintings often bore hidden encodings of human muscularity, with references to famous forms by Michelangelo. Later works seen in sequence for the first time here show eccentric visions either of posturing nudes (sometimes of ambiguous gender) couched as genii and goddesses, or as mannered figures acting out Christian subjects. His greatest strength remains always as a colorist; and while he will be remembered most for works in Synchronist style, his figural paintings--successful perhaps as kitsch when not considered seriously--do reflect the dauntlessness of one who worked so long in near poverty and virtual obscurity. Recommended for larger art collections. -M. Hamel-Schwulst, Towson State University


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