Cover image for The American canvas : paintings from the collection of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
Title:
The American canvas : paintings from the collection of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
Author:
Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Hudson Hills Press in association with the Museums ; [New York] : Distributed in the U.S. by Rizzoli International Publications, [1989]

©1989
Physical Description:
254 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 26 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781555950255

9781555950262
Format :
Book

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ND205 .F45 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Single-institution portfolios are rarely more gratifying than this. On right-hand pages are 105 paintings by 89 artists, all sharply reproduced in color (a tad too yellow or too light, perhaps), while on the facing pages are generous, literate, invitingly informative annotations. The paintings include portraits, landscapes, still lifes (among them, some of the stunning trompe l'oeils for which the Bay City's museums are famed), genre subjects, narratives, and a hair-raising satire by Whistler. They display as many styles as subjects and span from a 1670's portrait of a wealthy Bostonian's children to a 1945 urban dream-vision by Ben Shahn. A great many of American painting's great names appear, generally exemplified by less familiar works. A great many lesser lights also appear, often very strikingly; e.g., the "American Titian," William Page, is represented by a powerfully, even disturbingly erotic depiction of an embracing couple, surprisingly dated 1843. In all, a volume that will provide American art devotees hours of browsing enjoyment. Notes; index. --Ray Olson


Library Journal Review

Some 105 paintings of 89 artists from the estimable American collection of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco are presented in this beautifully illustrated survey. Ranging from colonial times to the mid-20th century, the collection is rich in portraits, landscapes, and trompe l'oeil paintings. Contrasting styles include the Impressionism of Childe Hassam and the regionalism of Grant Wood. Superb full-page color plates are accompanied by a page of informative but eye-straining text. While the book will not replace the more comprehensive studies of American art, it will appeal to art scholars as well as museum goers wishing to hone their art appreciation skills. Recommended for large collections on American art.-- Stephen Rees, Bucks Cty. Free Lib., Levittown, Pa. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Single-institution portfolios are rarely more gratifying than this. On right-hand pages are 105 paintings by 89 artists, all sharply reproduced in color (a tad too yellow or too light, perhaps), while on the facing pages are generous, literate, invitingly informative annotations. The paintings include portraits, landscapes, still lifes (among them, some of the stunning trompe l'oeils for which the Bay City's museums are famed), genre subjects, narratives, and a hair-raising satire by Whistler. They display as many styles as subjects and span from a 1670's portrait of a wealthy Bostonian's children to a 1945 urban dream-vision by Ben Shahn. A great many of American painting's great names appear, generally exemplified by less familiar works. A great many lesser lights also appear, often very strikingly; e.g., the "American Titian," William Page, is represented by a powerfully, even disturbingly erotic depiction of an embracing couple, surprisingly dated 1843. In all, a volume that will provide American art devotees hours of browsing enjoyment. Notes; index. --Ray Olson


Library Journal Review

Some 105 paintings of 89 artists from the estimable American collection of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco are presented in this beautifully illustrated survey. Ranging from colonial times to the mid-20th century, the collection is rich in portraits, landscapes, and trompe l'oeil paintings. Contrasting styles include the Impressionism of Childe Hassam and the regionalism of Grant Wood. Superb full-page color plates are accompanied by a page of informative but eye-straining text. While the book will not replace the more comprehensive studies of American art, it will appeal to art scholars as well as museum goers wishing to hone their art appreciation skills. Recommended for large collections on American art.-- Stephen Rees, Bucks Cty. Free Lib., Levittown, Pa. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.