Cover image for Gardening from the heart : why gardeners garden
Title:
Gardening from the heart : why gardeners garden
Author:
Olwell, Carol, 1944-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Berkeley, Calif. : Antelope Island Press, 1990.
Physical Description:
238 pages : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780917946042

9780917946059
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library SB455 .O49 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize
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Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Olwell interviewed 21 men and women "who live to garden and garden to live." These diverse gardeners include a self-proclaimed "horticultural thrill seeker" in Berkeley, California, who combines odd plant forms with sculptures; a couple in their seventies who transformed windswept dunes into a desert garden on a three-quarter acre lot in Santa Clara, Utah; a Billings, Montana, gardener who raises vegetables and ornamentals despite a growing season that averages 134 days; and a gardener in Alaska who complains that "the biggest animal pests in our garden are moose: fortunately, the snowshoe hare haven't discovered our garden yet." Olwell divides her book into chapters on "The Garden as Paradise," "The Garden as Provider," "The Garden as Teacher," and "The Garden as Healer," and concludes with a 41-page appendix of information about pesticides and a glossary of gardening terms. To include 82 color photographs; no index. --George Cohen


Publisher's Weekly Review

Why do gardeners do it? ``I was gardening, in part, to maintain my mental health; it was better than going to a psychiatrist.'' ``A lot of people like murder mysteries. I have the same feeling, only I like to unravel the mysteries of plants.'' ``I get a sense that I'm part of an ecosystem.'' ``The garden was home.'' From a market gardener to a university-trained plant geneticist, 21 plantsmen and women from the Western U.S. here explain the rhyme and reason of their enthusiasm in their own words. Introduced by Olwell ( Women of the West ), who also photographed each garden with zest and care, this appealing collection of oral histories should be enjoyed far and wide, inviting readers to discover that gardeners with grit can do their work nearly anywhere--in the Alaskan wilderness, the Utah desert or the San Francisco County Jail. What's needed, as Olwell makes clear, is persistence: one interviewee, a self-described ``terminal case,'' moved over 75 tons of rock in order to create a San Francisco oasis. Less a how-to than a why-to, Olwell's opus informs and inspires. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Olwell traveled around the western United States interviewing gardeners and photographing them and their gardens; the results are organized in this remarkable book. Olwell explores the diverse lives of these people and the myriad ways in which they have been affected by their interactions with plants. This celebration of gardening--from the deserts of the Southwest to Alaska, from highway landscaper to prison horticultural manager, from fruit tree specialist to garden artist--is a fascinating trip through experiences and emotions. Recommended for larger gardening collections.-- Annette Aiello, Smithsonian Tropical Research Inst., Panama (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Olwell interviewed 21 men and women "who live to garden and garden to live." These diverse gardeners include a self-proclaimed "horticultural thrill seeker" in Berkeley, California, who combines odd plant forms with sculptures; a couple in their seventies who transformed windswept dunes into a desert garden on a three-quarter acre lot in Santa Clara, Utah; a Billings, Montana, gardener who raises vegetables and ornamentals despite a growing season that averages 134 days; and a gardener in Alaska who complains that "the biggest animal pests in our garden are moose: fortunately, the snowshoe hare haven't discovered our garden yet." Olwell divides her book into chapters on "The Garden as Paradise," "The Garden as Provider," "The Garden as Teacher," and "The Garden as Healer," and concludes with a 41-page appendix of information about pesticides and a glossary of gardening terms. To include 82 color photographs; no index. --George Cohen


Publisher's Weekly Review

Why do gardeners do it? ``I was gardening, in part, to maintain my mental health; it was better than going to a psychiatrist.'' ``A lot of people like murder mysteries. I have the same feeling, only I like to unravel the mysteries of plants.'' ``I get a sense that I'm part of an ecosystem.'' ``The garden was home.'' From a market gardener to a university-trained plant geneticist, 21 plantsmen and women from the Western U.S. here explain the rhyme and reason of their enthusiasm in their own words. Introduced by Olwell ( Women of the West ), who also photographed each garden with zest and care, this appealing collection of oral histories should be enjoyed far and wide, inviting readers to discover that gardeners with grit can do their work nearly anywhere--in the Alaskan wilderness, the Utah desert or the San Francisco County Jail. What's needed, as Olwell makes clear, is persistence: one interviewee, a self-described ``terminal case,'' moved over 75 tons of rock in order to create a San Francisco oasis. Less a how-to than a why-to, Olwell's opus informs and inspires. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Olwell traveled around the western United States interviewing gardeners and photographing them and their gardens; the results are organized in this remarkable book. Olwell explores the diverse lives of these people and the myriad ways in which they have been affected by their interactions with plants. This celebration of gardening--from the deserts of the Southwest to Alaska, from highway landscaper to prison horticultural manager, from fruit tree specialist to garden artist--is a fascinating trip through experiences and emotions. Recommended for larger gardening collections.-- Annette Aiello, Smithsonian Tropical Research Inst., Panama (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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