Cover image for The dragon's robe
Title:
The dragon's robe
Author:
Lattimore, Deborah Nourse.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York, NY : Harper & Row, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
32 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
A young weaver in twelfth-century China saves her people from drought and foreign invasion by weaving the imperial dragon's robe.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.4 0.5 9491.
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780060237196

9780060237233
Format :
Book

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Frank E. Merriweather Library PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

A young weaver in twelfth-century China saves her people from drought and foreign invasion by weaving the imperial dragon's robe.


Summary

A young weaver in twelfth-century China saves her people from drought and foreign invasion by weaving the imperial dragon's robe.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Ages 5-8. Set in thirteenth-century China, this original fairy tale concerns the salvation of the country through the faithfulness of Kwan Yin, an orphan and a poor weaver. She makes her way to the emperor's palace, only to stop along the way to help an old man, posing as the guardian of the dragon shrine, who is, in actuality, the emperor in disguise. He appoints first one, then another powerful person to tend the shrine during his illness. Only Kwan Yin proves herself worthy and lets loose the magical power of the dragon, which defeats the invading army. Inspired by elements of traditional Chinese paintings, Lattimore's full-color illustrations set the action within a series of changing landscapes. Deep, earth tones predominate, with quick brush strokes giving vitality to the rather crowded scenes. The text appears within a series of bordered panels coordinated with the artwork and occasionally incorporating a scene of Kwan Yin's weaving. Though the moral need not have been so blatantly spelled out in the end, the tale itself provides a satisfying adventure for older picture-book audiences. --Carolyn Phelan


Publisher's Weekly Review

Elegantly told in the manner of a classic fairy tale, Lattimore's fable is set in China in the 13th century, a time when the dragon was believed to be ``king of the heavens and ruler of fortune on earth.'' Young Kwan Yin is an orphan girl who travels with her loom, receiving food and shelter in exchange for weaving. Learning that there is a reward for weaving a dragon robe for the Emperor, she sets off for the palace. On her way, she befriends a sick old man who turns out to be the Emperor himself. The man says he is the keeper of the dragon shrine, and bravely Kwan Yin helps him protect it from a greedy overseer and general in the kingdom. In the end, Kwan Yin's goodness serves as a foil against the forces of evil, both within the kingdom and outside it. In burnished tones of brown and gold, Lattimore's intricate, sumptuous paintings transform each spread into a rich tapestry. Ages 6-10. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-5-- An original story using traditional folk motifs, greatly enriched by stunning artwork. Kwan Yin saves China by weaving a dragon robe for the emperor to placate the rain dragon who has been angered by the emperor's false ministers. Faithful Kwan Yin not only observes their treachery, but she also steadfastly weaves the dragon robe in the face of all danger until it is finished and taken by the rain dragon who, in return, destroys the enemy. Lattimore uses traditional Chinese designs and colors in picturing an imaginative phoenix, a ferocious tiger, and a magnificent dragon. The text appears as scrolls on each page with textured, inset, seemingly woven scenes at the tops of many of them, adding to the visual narration. The story is less impressive and clear than the paintings; its convoluted and sometimes confusing plot leaves readers with unanswered questions concerning the characters' motivation and rewards. Still, readers may find the theme of treachery punished and faithfulness recognized exciting and satisfying and will be captivated by the illustrations. --Louise L. Sherman, Anna C. Scott School, Leonia, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

According to PW , ``Intricate, sumptuous paintings transform each spread into a rich tapestry'' in this ``elegantly told'' tale of an itinerant Chinese orphan whose beneficence toward an old man earns her the Emperor's gratitude. Ages 6-10. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


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