Cover image for The glass menagerie : an American memory
Title:
The glass menagerie : an American memory
Author:
Presley, Delma Eugene.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boston : Twayne Publishers, 1990.
Physical Description:
xvi, 117 pages ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780805780581

9780805781274
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PS3545.I5365 G5365 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Delma E. Presley's 'The Glass Menagerie: An American Memory' offers a cogent and thorough analysis of Tennessee William's masterpiece. The study addresses such issues as characterization, structure, and the visual and dramatic devices used to create this compelling 'memory play.'


Summary

Delma E. Presley's 'The Glass Menagerie: An American Memory' offers a cogent and thorough analysis of Tennessee William's masterpiece. The study addresses such issues as characterization, structure, and the visual and dramatic devices used to create this compelling 'memory play.'


Reviews 2

Choice Review

This book is addressed to an audience that has no knowledge of Tennessee Williams or The Glass Menagerie yet is familiar not only with such names as Ibsen. Strindberg, and Lawrence and with such terms as "expressionism" and "realism," but also with theater production in general. Does such an audience exist? The volume's one illustration is a case in point: it is a full-page portrait photo of Williams. How much more informative and pertinent would be a picture of the special staging Williams requests for this play. Yet the account is enthusiastic and generally responsible, if not exciting. Its most likely readers would be novice scholar-critics, advanced high-school or junior-college students, who could find it usable in a context of lectures, other readings, and performances. J. Hafley St. John's University (NY)


Choice Review

This book is addressed to an audience that has no knowledge of Tennessee Williams or The Glass Menagerie yet is familiar not only with such names as Ibsen. Strindberg, and Lawrence and with such terms as "expressionism" and "realism," but also with theater production in general. Does such an audience exist? The volume's one illustration is a case in point: it is a full-page portrait photo of Williams. How much more informative and pertinent would be a picture of the special staging Williams requests for this play. Yet the account is enthusiastic and generally responsible, if not exciting. Its most likely readers would be novice scholar-critics, advanced high-school or junior-college students, who could find it usable in a context of lectures, other readings, and performances. J. Hafley St. John's University (NY)


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