Cover image for A form of taking it all
Title:
A form of taking it all
Author:
Waldrop, Rosmarie.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Barrytown, NY : Station Hill Press : Distributed by the Talman Co., [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
90 pages ; 23 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780882680910

9780882680927
Format :
Book

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Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

In her second work of fiction, poet and translator Waldrop ( The Hanky of Pippin's Daughter, LJ 3/1/87) presents figures reminiscent of shadow puppets moving in blurred distance; when brought into focus, their emotions seem to exist without physical form. Moving from Mexico City to Washington, from past to present, this story of the budding relationship between two women is at once personal, historical, and political: ``Columbus, the first to connect with the NEW WORLD: and the two hemispheres which God had cast asunder were united, how sexual, and began to become alike.'' With subtle repetition, imagery describing a dance or the making of a pot is offered as strangely insightful character description. Sources such as Poetry Handbook, The Conquest of Mexico , and a novel by Jane Bowles are collaged into an experimental gem that will more than likely intimidate the uninitiated. For larger collections.-- Rochelle Ratner, formerly Poetry Editor, ``Soho Weekly News,'' New York (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Library Journal Review

In her second work of fiction, poet and translator Waldrop ( The Hanky of Pippin's Daughter, LJ 3/1/87) presents figures reminiscent of shadow puppets moving in blurred distance; when brought into focus, their emotions seem to exist without physical form. Moving from Mexico City to Washington, from past to present, this story of the budding relationship between two women is at once personal, historical, and political: ``Columbus, the first to connect with the NEW WORLD: and the two hemispheres which God had cast asunder were united, how sexual, and began to become alike.'' With subtle repetition, imagery describing a dance or the making of a pot is offered as strangely insightful character description. Sources such as Poetry Handbook, The Conquest of Mexico , and a novel by Jane Bowles are collaged into an experimental gem that will more than likely intimidate the uninitiated. For larger collections.-- Rochelle Ratner, formerly Poetry Editor, ``Soho Weekly News,'' New York (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.