Cover image for The game of statues
Title:
The game of statues
Author:
Hollander, Martha.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Atlantic Monthly Press, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
ix, 86 pages ; 22 cm
General Note:
Poems.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780871133694

9780871133700
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PS3558.O34945 G36 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Reviews 4

Publisher's Weekly Review

In a remarkableused to describe essays, above.eed/i changed above/stet here/pk first volume of poems, winner of the 1989 Walt Whitman Award, Hollander treats us to a highly imaginative array of manner and matter. She weaves tantalizing, curiously humorous narratives, as in ``The Detective Examines the Body,'' where we follow, in Watsonian fashion, a sleuth from crime to solution. Her provocative work may begin in fantasy yet closes with sober reckonings: in ``You, Me and the Thing,'' a threatening creature, ``glittering and fanged,'' is revealed as ``our very own.'' If otherworldly landscapes prevail here, they always serve to illuminate private dreams, as when the moon, seen through a telescope, becomes ``the blank heart of our own lone eye.'' Even when Hollander writes of more conventional subjects--traveling in Europe, art, architecture--she sustains an exceptionally dramatic, often lushly romantic tone. Her poems finally strike us as similar to the Van Gogh canvas she describes in ``In the Museum'': ``That thick stroke, here in life-giving yellow, / there in blue, parodies a caress / that pulls back even as it agitates / and arouses.'' (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

This accomplished first book, selected by W.S. Merwin for the 1989 Walt Whitman Award, is exceptionally rich in sensory imagery. Attention to detail--light that ``sifts'' into a room through venetian blinds, girls playing in grass ``served up by the platters of their spread skirts''--gives these poems a texture and musicality lacking in much contemporary poetry. A painterly poet, Hollander occasionally overwrites, forcing images to carry too much weight. But she's also rewarding, as in ``Accidents,'' when she lets a skid on ice lead her to reflect on the way ``we come skidding/ into the world with a gasp, a yell, a crash'' and in the witty ``Magnificat,'' marking ``the struggle of counterpoint'' in human relations with the admonition to ``keep singing.'' Hollander has made an impressive debut. --Kathleen Norris, Lemmon P.L., S.D. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

In a remarkableused to describe essays, above.eed/i changed above/stet here/pk first volume of poems, winner of the 1989 Walt Whitman Award, Hollander treats us to a highly imaginative array of manner and matter. She weaves tantalizing, curiously humorous narratives, as in ``The Detective Examines the Body,'' where we follow, in Watsonian fashion, a sleuth from crime to solution. Her provocative work may begin in fantasy yet closes with sober reckonings: in ``You, Me and the Thing,'' a threatening creature, ``glittering and fanged,'' is revealed as ``our very own.'' If otherworldly landscapes prevail here, they always serve to illuminate private dreams, as when the moon, seen through a telescope, becomes ``the blank heart of our own lone eye.'' Even when Hollander writes of more conventional subjects--traveling in Europe, art, architecture--she sustains an exceptionally dramatic, often lushly romantic tone. Her poems finally strike us as similar to the Van Gogh canvas she describes in ``In the Museum'': ``That thick stroke, here in life-giving yellow, / there in blue, parodies a caress / that pulls back even as it agitates / and arouses.'' (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

This accomplished first book, selected by W.S. Merwin for the 1989 Walt Whitman Award, is exceptionally rich in sensory imagery. Attention to detail--light that ``sifts'' into a room through venetian blinds, girls playing in grass ``served up by the platters of their spread skirts''--gives these poems a texture and musicality lacking in much contemporary poetry. A painterly poet, Hollander occasionally overwrites, forcing images to carry too much weight. But she's also rewarding, as in ``Accidents,'' when she lets a skid on ice lead her to reflect on the way ``we come skidding/ into the world with a gasp, a yell, a crash'' and in the witty ``Magnificat,'' marking ``the struggle of counterpoint'' in human relations with the admonition to ``keep singing.'' Hollander has made an impressive debut. --Kathleen Norris, Lemmon P.L., S.D. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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