Cover image for Shaker inventions
Title:
Shaker inventions
Author:
Bolick, Nancy O'Keefe.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York, N.Y. : Walker, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
96 pages : illustrations, map ; 22 cm
Summary:
Describes the culture and daily way of life of the Shakers and the religious motives inspiring them.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780802769336

9780802769343
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Describes the culture and daily way of life of the Shakers and the religious motives inspiring them.


Summary

Describes the culture and daily way of life of the Shakers and the religious motives inspiring them.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 6-8. Most American youngsters know little about the Shakers, whose communities developed in New England in the late 1700s. In an absorbing manner, Bolick and Randolph explain a life-style that was governed by religious beliefs: a search for excellence and perfection. High standards for cleanliness, good food, fitness, fresh air, a use of everything (including time), and a waste of nothing forced the Shakers to think creatively. The authors point out that the Shakers may not have invented every item history gives them credit for. However, it was their determination to make life more efficient and to produce a finer product that led to their adopting the first commercial washing machine, clothespins, the sulphur match, the double rolling pin, and tilting hospital beds. In the nineteenth century, the Shakers became famous for their delicious apple pies, strikingly carved furniture, natural medicines, and the fashionable Dorothy Cloak (a distinctive cape that was worn by Mrs. Cleveland to the inaugural ball in 1893). Always forward-looking and astute in business, the Shakers sold their wares by a mail-order catalog in the 1800s. This nicely designed book (with the exception of the misspellings of Randolph's name on the title page and Bolick's name on the spine) includes illustrations of the many Shaker inventions and products executed in finely shaded pen-and-ink drawings that perfectly reflect the simplicity and grace of the Shakers' lives. Although few Shakers are still living, they leave a legacy worthy of our perusal. --Deborah Abbott


School Library Journal Review

Bolick and Randolph have built their narrative around the many ingenious inventions for which the Shakers are given credit. Readers will come to understand both Shaker history and their way of life as various aspects of their inventions are discussed. The authors' spare narrative conveys the information directly, but in a rather dry manner. Francisco's sketches of the machinery are clear and informative, but those of people are awkwardly drawn; pictures are not always found on the pages on which they are discussed. Although it gives less detail on the inventions, Jane Yolen's Simple Gifts (Viking, 1976; o.p.) provides a full account of the history and life of the Shakers in much more vivid and readable prose. --Sylvia S. Marantz, Wellington School, Columbus, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 6-8. Most American youngsters know little about the Shakers, whose communities developed in New England in the late 1700s. In an absorbing manner, Bolick and Randolph explain a life-style that was governed by religious beliefs: a search for excellence and perfection. High standards for cleanliness, good food, fitness, fresh air, a use of everything (including time), and a waste of nothing forced the Shakers to think creatively. The authors point out that the Shakers may not have invented every item history gives them credit for. However, it was their determination to make life more efficient and to produce a finer product that led to their adopting the first commercial washing machine, clothespins, the sulphur match, the double rolling pin, and tilting hospital beds. In the nineteenth century, the Shakers became famous for their delicious apple pies, strikingly carved furniture, natural medicines, and the fashionable Dorothy Cloak (a distinctive cape that was worn by Mrs. Cleveland to the inaugural ball in 1893). Always forward-looking and astute in business, the Shakers sold their wares by a mail-order catalog in the 1800s. This nicely designed book (with the exception of the misspellings of Randolph's name on the title page and Bolick's name on the spine) includes illustrations of the many Shaker inventions and products executed in finely shaded pen-and-ink drawings that perfectly reflect the simplicity and grace of the Shakers' lives. Although few Shakers are still living, they leave a legacy worthy of our perusal. --Deborah Abbott


School Library Journal Review

Bolick and Randolph have built their narrative around the many ingenious inventions for which the Shakers are given credit. Readers will come to understand both Shaker history and their way of life as various aspects of their inventions are discussed. The authors' spare narrative conveys the information directly, but in a rather dry manner. Francisco's sketches of the machinery are clear and informative, but those of people are awkwardly drawn; pictures are not always found on the pages on which they are discussed. Although it gives less detail on the inventions, Jane Yolen's Simple Gifts (Viking, 1976; o.p.) provides a full account of the history and life of the Shakers in much more vivid and readable prose. --Sylvia S. Marantz, Wellington School, Columbus, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.