Cover image for Drinking water hazards : how to know if there are toxic chemicals in your water and what to do if there are
Title:
Drinking water hazards : how to know if there are toxic chemicals in your water and what to do if there are
Author:
Stewart, John Cary, 1958-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Hiram, Ohio : Envirographics, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
vi, 323 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780943163161

9780943163154
Format :
Book

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RA591 .S83 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Reviews 6

Booklist Review

A sad commentary on the state of our environment--300 pages about how and why your drinking water can poison you. Stewart, an environmental chemist and consultant, has written the handbook on determining the quality of water in the home. Not content to just discuss the various tests, he first explains sources of drinking water, the various contaminates and how they get into the water supply, and what effects they have on your health. In addition, he covers the fluoridation debate and regulations governing what chemicals are considered safe. Different kinds of water-testing laboratories are described, as are various testing methods, costs, and how to interpret results and choose home treatments. Highly specialized, but thorough and comprehensible, this volume meets the needs of the health conscious and environmentally active. References, appendixes, glossary; index. --Donna Seaman


Library Journal Review

The title is somewhat misleading, since this book looks at various types of water contamination; only the final third of the book discusses testing of drinking water, and coverage of water treatment options is limited to one 13-page chapter. Stewart has compiled a wealth of statistical information on water contamination and its ill effects, mostly drawn from U.S. government publications and scientific journal articles. Unfortunately, there is little new information presented here, and libraries needing further information on this important topic would probably be better served by obtaining some of the materials cited in the book's impressive reference and bibliography sections. Another source to consider is Steve Coffel's But Not a Drop to Drink! , LJ 3/1/89.--Ed.--Deborah Emerson, Monroe Community Coll., Rochester, N.Y. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

An excellent introduction to one of the most critical environmental and public health problems. Stewart begins with startling documentation of the increases of cancer and other diseases that may be environmentally induced. He discusses the increases in the use of synthetic organic chemicals, and covers each group of drinking-water contaminants in some detail: inorganic chemicals, heavy metals, bacteria and viruses, radionuclides, nitrates, and organic chemicals, including pesticides. He continues with an introduction to methods for testing and treating water supplies. These are probably too detailed for the general public (except for citizen-action groups) but are informative. Stewart ends with a call for recycling and for a change in attitude toward water pollution and its consequences. A useful glossary is included. However, the discussion of surface-water contamination processes is minimal and groundwater hydrology is oversimplified; for example, the use of "water-ways" for aquifers is misleading. The binding of the book is not good--the pages will fall out after heavy use. Nonetheless, on the whole, an instructive volume that deserves wide distribution both to the general public and to students at high school and college levels. J. M. Sharp Jr. University of Texas at Austin


Booklist Review

A sad commentary on the state of our environment--300 pages about how and why your drinking water can poison you. Stewart, an environmental chemist and consultant, has written the handbook on determining the quality of water in the home. Not content to just discuss the various tests, he first explains sources of drinking water, the various contaminates and how they get into the water supply, and what effects they have on your health. In addition, he covers the fluoridation debate and regulations governing what chemicals are considered safe. Different kinds of water-testing laboratories are described, as are various testing methods, costs, and how to interpret results and choose home treatments. Highly specialized, but thorough and comprehensible, this volume meets the needs of the health conscious and environmentally active. References, appendixes, glossary; index. --Donna Seaman


Library Journal Review

The title is somewhat misleading, since this book looks at various types of water contamination; only the final third of the book discusses testing of drinking water, and coverage of water treatment options is limited to one 13-page chapter. Stewart has compiled a wealth of statistical information on water contamination and its ill effects, mostly drawn from U.S. government publications and scientific journal articles. Unfortunately, there is little new information presented here, and libraries needing further information on this important topic would probably be better served by obtaining some of the materials cited in the book's impressive reference and bibliography sections. Another source to consider is Steve Coffel's But Not a Drop to Drink! , LJ 3/1/89.--Ed.--Deborah Emerson, Monroe Community Coll., Rochester, N.Y. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

An excellent introduction to one of the most critical environmental and public health problems. Stewart begins with startling documentation of the increases of cancer and other diseases that may be environmentally induced. He discusses the increases in the use of synthetic organic chemicals, and covers each group of drinking-water contaminants in some detail: inorganic chemicals, heavy metals, bacteria and viruses, radionuclides, nitrates, and organic chemicals, including pesticides. He continues with an introduction to methods for testing and treating water supplies. These are probably too detailed for the general public (except for citizen-action groups) but are informative. Stewart ends with a call for recycling and for a change in attitude toward water pollution and its consequences. A useful glossary is included. However, the discussion of surface-water contamination processes is minimal and groundwater hydrology is oversimplified; for example, the use of "water-ways" for aquifers is misleading. The binding of the book is not good--the pages will fall out after heavy use. Nonetheless, on the whole, an instructive volume that deserves wide distribution both to the general public and to students at high school and college levels. J. M. Sharp Jr. University of Texas at Austin