Cover image for Romanticism (1830-1890)
Title:
Romanticism (1830-1890)
Author:
Abraham, Gerald, 1904-1988.
Publication Information:
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1990.
Physical Description:
xx, 935 pages : illustrations, music ; 25 cm.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1510 Lexile.
ISBN:
9780193163096
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

The New Oxford History of Music is complete This latest and last volume: * completes the set of The New Oxford History of Music in 10 volumes * includes the whole span of western instrumental music and opera in the greater part of the nineteenth century * is edited by one of the most respected scholars of nineteenth-century music In March 1830 Goethe complained to Eckermann that `everybody talks now about Classicism and Romanticism - which no one thought of fifty years ago'. Romanticism - a concept more easily recognized than defined - was the prevailing spirit of the vast outpouring of music in the sixty years chronicledin this volume. The list of major composers treated either wholly or in part will serve as an indication of its scope: Chopin, Schumann, Mendelssohn, Liszt, Brahms, Berlioz, Donizetti, Verdi, Wagner, Gounod, Bizet, Borodin, Mussorgsky, Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Dvorak, Smetana, Faure, Wolf,Puccini, Bruckner, Mahler, Strauss, Cesar Franck, Debussy. Contributors: Gerald Abraham, John Horton, David Charlton, David Kimbell, Siegfried Goslich, Nicholas Temperly, Willi Kahl, Arnold Whittall, Julian Budden, Robert Pascall, Leslie Orrey, David Tunley, Edward Garden, Rosemary Hunt, and John Clapham.


Author Notes

Gerald E. Abraham is one of the world's most respected musicologists.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

This comprehensive set of essays by 15 well-known authors (John Horton, Nicholas Temperley, Willi Kahl, Julian Budden, David Charlton, editor Abraham, et al.) is divided into two epochs, 1830-1850 and 1850-1890. These in turn are divided into discussions by genre: orchestral music, chamber music, opera, piano music, the symphonic poem, the solo song, and choral music. Each genre section is further subdivided by country. Editor Abraham has taken a firm hand to make the styles of the essays consistent and the content of the book comprehensive. The book's emphasis on genre provides a very distinctive perspective for this period, different from the more usual composer-oriented approach. One gets a broad sense of style beyond famous composers to encompass the entire period: the works of lesser-known composers are discussed and placed in context. Musical examples--often ones not otherwise easily available--illustrate the trends of the period. Frequent internal subtitles are, however, intrusive on the content and flow of the essays. Overall, an excellent, concrete, and detailed account of the period. Good bibliography. Highly recommended from lower-division undergraduate level onward. -C. Cai, Kenyon College


Table of Contents

Gerald AbrahamJohn HortonDavid CharltonDavid CharltonDavid KimbellSiegfried GoslichGerald AbrahamNicholas TemperleyWilli KahlArnold WhittallGerald AbrahamDavid CharltonJulian BuddenGerald AbrahamNicholas TemperleyGerald AbrahamRobert PascallLeslie OrreyDavid TunleyEdward GardenRosemary HuntJohn ClaphamJohn HortonNicholas TemperleyGerald Abraham
Publisher's Notep. xiv
Illustrationsp. xv
Introductionp. xvii
I. New Tendencies in Orchestral Music: 1830-1850p. 1
The Concert Overturep. 1
Mendelssohn's Overturesp. 2
Mendelssohn's Followersp. 5
Berlioz's Overturesp. 8
Wagner's Early Overturesp. 12
Schumann's Overturesp. 14
Incidental Musicp. 16
Glinkap. 18
Mendelssohn's Symphoniesp. 20
Berlioz's Symphoniesp. 25
The French Ode-symphoniep. 31
Spohrp. 32
Minor Symphonic Composersp. 38
Schumann as Symphonistp. 41
Problems of the Romantic Concertop. 45
Enlargement of the Orchestral Palettep. 49
Berlioz and the Romantic Orchestrap. 57
II. Chamber Music: 1830-1850p. 60
Amateur and Professional Playersp. 60
Chamber Music in Francep. 61
Conditions in Englandp. 62
Combinations of Strings and Windp. 63
Schumann's Chamber Musicp. 65
Duet Sonatasp. 68
The Piano Triop. 69
Scandinavian Chamber Musicp. 72
Chamber Music for Strings by Mendelssohn and Spohrp. 74
The Period in Perspectivep. 80
III. Romantic Opera: 1830-1850
(a) Grand Operap. 85
Staging and Costumep. 85
Auber's La Muette de Porticip. 87
External Traitsp. 89
A New Design Elementp. 91
Internal Musical Traitsp. 92
Meyerbeer's Robert le diablep. 93
Meyerbeer's Les Huguenotsp. 97
Auber's Gustave III, ou le bal masquep. 100
Halevy's La Juivep. 101
Halevy's Guido et Ginevrap. 104
Halevy's La Reine de Chyprep. 105
Halevy's Charles VIp. 107
Berlioz's Benvenuto Cellinip. 108
Donizetti in Parisp. 112
Meyerbeer's Le Prophetep. 116
(b) Opera Comiquep. 120
The Composers and Librettistsp. 121
Auberp. 123
Halevyp. 129
Adamp. 131
Thomasp. 134
Orchestrationp. 137
(c) Italyp. 140
Italian Romanticism: Art and Politicsp. 140
The Place of Opera in Italian Societyp. 141
Dramatic and Musical Principlesp. 142
Reappraisalp. 145
Donizetti's Mature Operas: General Characteristicsp. 146
Donizetti as Musician and Craftsmanp. 151
Mercadante's Reform Operasp. 155
The Inspiration of Extra-musical Ideas: Politicsp. 162
The Inspiration of Extra-musical Ideas: Literaturep. 165
Hugo and Verdip. 167
Shakespeare and Verdip. 168
Schiller and Verdip. 172
Lesser Mastersp. 174
The Decline of Opera buffap. 177
The Performance of Italian Romantic Operap. 182
The Appreciation of Operap. 183
(d) Germanyp. 185
Stage and Composerp. 185
The Theatre Conductorsp. 186
The Leading Mastersp. 188
Lortzingp. 190
Mendelssohn and Nicolaip. 190
Schumannp. 191
Flotowp. 192
Wagnerp. 193
Librettistsp. 196
The Fate of the 'Number Opera'p. 199
The Overturep. 200
The Liedp. 202
The Romanzep. 203
Ballade, Cavatina, and Preghierap. 203
The Ariap. 205
Ensemble and Chorusp. 208
Scene Compositionp. 209
(e) Russia and Eastern Europep. 213
Russiap. 213
Verstovskyp. 214
Glinkap. 216
Dargomizhskyp. 222
Polandp. 223
Non-German Opera in the Habsburg Empirep. 224
(f) Britain and the United Statesp. 228
Bishopp. 228
Barnett and Loderp. 229
Balfep. 231
Wallacep. 233
The United Statesp. 235
IV. Romantic Piano Music: 1830-1850p. 237
The Piano of the 1830sp. 237
The Crisis of the Sonatap. 238
Schumann's Sonatasp. 241
Schumann's C Major Phantasiep. 243
Schumann and the Variation Principlep. 243
Lisztp. 247
Chopinp. 250
Other Sonata Composersp. 252
Mendelssohn's Lieder ohne Wortep. 253
The Slav Landsp. 255
V. Wagner's Later Stage Worksp. 257
Life and Worksp. 257
Theoriesp. 258
Compositional Proceduresp. 263
Tonalityp. 266
Der Ring des Nibelungenp. 268
Das Rheingoldp. 270
Die Walkurep. 277
Siegfried (1)p. 286
Tristan und Isoldep. 291
Die Meistersinger von Nurnbergp. 296
Siegfried (2)p. 302
Gotterdammerungp. 307
Parsifalp. 315
Wagner's Heritagep. 319
VI. Opera: 1850-1890
(a) Germanyp. 322
Corneliusp. 322
Goetzp. 324
Goldmark, Bruch, and Rubinsteinp. 327
(b) Francep. 327
The 1850s and 1860sp. 327
Opera comique to 1862p. 328
Meyerbeer's operas comiquesp. 331
Offenbach and Operettap. 333
Gounod's Minor Worksp. 334
Berlioz's Beatrice et Benedictp. 334
Berlioz's Les Troyensp. 336
Gounod's Genius Revealedp. 339
Faustp. 343
Gounod's Later Worksp. 346
Meyerbeer's L'Africainep. 349
Verdi in Parisp. 354
'Heightened Lyrical Speech'p. 362
Thomas's Later Worksp. 363
Bizet's Youthful Worksp. 367
Bizet's Stylep. 370
Les Pecheurs de perlesp. 375
La Jolie Fille de Perthp. 376
Djamilehp. 378
Carmenp. 380
The 1870s and 1880sp. 385
Saint-Saiensp. 386
Massenetp. 390
Offenbach's Les Contes d'Hoffmannp. 395
Lalop. 397
Delibesp. 398
Reyerp. 401
Chabrierp. 405
(c) Italyp. 409
The Later Tragic Operas of Mercadante and Pacinip. 412
Opera Buffa and Semiseriap. 414
The Middle Generation: Petrella, Pedrotti, and Cagnonip. 415
Reform from the North: Faccio and Boitop. 417
The Verdian Synthesisp. 420
Italian 'Grand Opera'p. 425
The Later Verdip. 427
Otello and Falstaffp. 429
The Conservatives: Ponchielli and Gomesp. 431
The Radical Element: Catalani and Franchettip. 434
Towards Verismop. 436
(d) Russia and Eastern Europep. 438
Russiap. 438
Serovp. 440
The New Generationp. 443
Borodin's Prince Igorp. 445
Mussorgskyp. 446
Rimsky-Korsakovp. 447
Tchaikovskyp. 450
Poland and Moniuszkop. 459
Moniuszko's Later Operasp. 461
Moniuszko's Successorsp. 464
Czechoslovakiap. 464
Smetanap. 465
Smetana's Contemporariesp. 472
Dvorakp. 473
Fibich and Kovarovicp. 474
Hungaryp. 477
(e) Britain and the United Statesp. 479
British Operap. 479
Macfarrenp. 480
Later Romantic Operasp. 481
Comic Operap. 482
Sullivanp. 483
The Savoy Operas in the United Statesp. 485
American Operetta and Operap. 486
Incidental Musicp. 487
VII. The Symphonic Poem and Kindred Forms.p. 489
Liszt's Overture Poemsp. 490
Liszt's Earlier Disciplesp. 491
Liszt's Symphonische Dichtungenp. 492
Liszt's Influence in Russiap. 499
Tchaikovskyp. 504
'Musical Pictures'p. 506
The Symphonic Poem in Germanyp. 509
English Progressivesp. 511
The Symphonic Poem in Francep. 512
Franck and his Circlep. 518
Smetana and Dvorakp. 522
The Wagnerian Legacyp. 525
VIII. Major Instrumental Forms: 1850-1890p. 534
Historical Perspectivesp. 534
Programmaticismp. 536
Nationalismp. 540
Brahms and the Piano Sonatap. 542
Liszt and the Sonatap. 545
Brahms's Piano Variationsp. 550
Piano Variations by Brahms's Contemporariesp. 555
German Organ Musicp. 556
French Innovationsp. 558
The Suitep. 560
The Re-emergence of the Suite in Mid-Centuryp. 562
The Suite in the 1880sp. 570
The Extract Suitep. 572
The Serenadep. 573
Varied Conceptions of the Symphonyp. 575
Stylistic Characteristicsp. 578
Programme Symphonies of the 1850s: Schumann, Lisztp. 580
Raff's Programme Symphoniesp. 582
Revitalization of Classical Forms: Brucknerp. 585
Brahms's Symphoniesp. 593
The Symphonies of Strauss and Mahlerp. 600
The Symphony in Russiap. 602
Tchaikovsky's Symphoniesp. 606
The Symphony in Francep. 610
Dvorak's Symphoniesp. 611
The Concertop. 615
Variations for Soloist and Orchestrap. 620
Chamber Musicp. 621
Chamber Music in Germany and Austriap. 624
Brahms's Chamber Worksp. 628
Further Contemporaries of Brahmsp. 635
Russian Chamber Musicp. 636
French Chamber Musicp. 640
Smetana's Chamber Worksp. 647
Dvorak's Chamber Worksp. 648
IX. Solo Song
(a) Germanyp. 659
Schumannp. 659
The 1840 Songsp. 659
Schumann's Later Songsp. 662
Mendelssohnp. 663
Lisztp. 666
Franzp. 669
Wagner, Cornelius, and Jensenp. 670
Brahmsp. 672
Brahms and the Volksliedp. 676
Mahlerp. 677
Straussp. 678
Wolfp. 679
Conclusionp. 682
(b) Francep. 684
The Romancep. 684
Romance and Melodiep. 688
The 1830sp. 689
The Mid-Centuryp. 690
New Directionsp. 692
The Perfection of Melodiep. 696
The Last Decadep. 702
(c) Russiap. 704
Glinka and Dargomizhskyp. 705
Balakirev and Cuip. 708
Rimsky-Korsakovp. 710
Tchaikovskyp. 712
Borodinp. 714
Mussorgskyp. 717
Rubinsteinp. 722
(d) Polandp. 725
Chopinp. 727
Moniuszkop. 729
Zelenskip. 733
Later Nineteenth-century Composersp. 733
(e) Czechoslovakiap. 739
The Czech Renaissancep. 740
Poetic Sourcesp. 742
Bendlp. 743
Smetanap. 745
Fibichp. 747
Dvorakp. 750
(f) Scandinaviap. 756
Denmarkp. 756
Swedenp. 759
Finlandp. 763
Norwayp. 765
Griegp. 767
(g) Britain and the United Statesp. 769
German Influencep. 770
Sterndale Bennettp. 771
Piersonp. 773
Sullivanp. 776
Women Composersp. 777
Art-song in Americap. 777
Macdowellp. 779
Art-song in the English Traditionp. 781
Indigenous Song in The United Statesp. 784
The 'Sacred Song'p. 786
Parry and Stanfordp. 787
X Choral Musicp. 793
Mendelssohnp. 793
Schumannp. 797
Berliozp. 799
Berlioz's Contemporariesp. 801
Lisztp. 803
Brucknerp. 808
Brahmsp. 810
Dvorakp. 813
Verdip. 815
France After 1870p. 817
Polandp. 820
Russiap. 823
Spainp. 826
Britainp. 827
United Statesp. 829
Bibliographyp. 831
Indexp. 905