Cover image for Biography of a river : the living Mississippi
Title:
Biography of a river : the living Mississippi
Author:
McCall, Edith S.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Walker, 1990.
Physical Description:
162 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Summary:
Traces the history of the Mississippi River, presents stories of people whose lives were affected by the river, and describes how humans have changed the Mississippi.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780802769145

9780802769152
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library F351 .M37 1990 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

"An intriguing introduction to political, historical, and economic changes along the fiver". -- KR.


Summary

Traces the history of the Mississippi River, presents stories of people whose lives were affected by the river, and describes how humans have changed the Mississippi.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 4-8. McCall recounts the story of the Mississippi River, giving a little information about its geology and geography and its use by the Mound Builders and Indians, and a great deal about its place in American history (particularly in the 1800s). The subtitle refers to the liveliness of the river itself, not to any wildlife it supports; that is beyond the scope of the book. Serious students may be put off by the prelude, written in folksy first person from the river's point of view, and by continual references to the Mississippi as "Old Man River." Still, the main text contains interesting accounts of voyager exploration and trade, the advent of steamboats, riverboat and showboat traffic, the coming of railroad bridges, and the river's repeated reshaping by the Army Corps of Engineers. Black-and-white drawings, maps, prints, and photographs of varying quality appear throughout the book. A helpful glossary is appended. --Carolyn Phelan


School Library Journal Review

This look at the Mississippi focuses on the river's importance to the history of North America. McCall offers background about the early river history and Indian use, but she concentrates on the river's heyday, the steamboat age, before the railroads took over. She describes in detail the ways in which people have shaped the river to their needs, but emphasizes that it is a living system which is never quite tamed, and discusses current problems such as pollution. McCall writes clearly and comprehensively of people and events . There is little about women's roles on the river, but she is very objective in her treatment of native Americans. Black-and-white period illustrations and photos show how people have viewed the river throughout history. Although this book is historical rather than geographical in focus, it lacks a clearly marked map of the Mississippi drainage area. This flaw makes it difficult for readers to identify places mentioned in the text without the aid of a supplemental map. Steamboats on the Mississippi (American Heritage, 1962; o.p.) remains a good source on Mississippi history and contains better illustrations and maps. Libraries seeking more current material about the history of the Mississippi will find this book a good replacement or companion title purchase. --Mary Mueller, Rolla Junior High School, MO (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 4-8. McCall recounts the story of the Mississippi River, giving a little information about its geology and geography and its use by the Mound Builders and Indians, and a great deal about its place in American history (particularly in the 1800s). The subtitle refers to the liveliness of the river itself, not to any wildlife it supports; that is beyond the scope of the book. Serious students may be put off by the prelude, written in folksy first person from the river's point of view, and by continual references to the Mississippi as "Old Man River." Still, the main text contains interesting accounts of voyager exploration and trade, the advent of steamboats, riverboat and showboat traffic, the coming of railroad bridges, and the river's repeated reshaping by the Army Corps of Engineers. Black-and-white drawings, maps, prints, and photographs of varying quality appear throughout the book. A helpful glossary is appended. --Carolyn Phelan


School Library Journal Review

This look at the Mississippi focuses on the river's importance to the history of North America. McCall offers background about the early river history and Indian use, but she concentrates on the river's heyday, the steamboat age, before the railroads took over. She describes in detail the ways in which people have shaped the river to their needs, but emphasizes that it is a living system which is never quite tamed, and discusses current problems such as pollution. McCall writes clearly and comprehensively of people and events . There is little about women's roles on the river, but she is very objective in her treatment of native Americans. Black-and-white period illustrations and photos show how people have viewed the river throughout history. Although this book is historical rather than geographical in focus, it lacks a clearly marked map of the Mississippi drainage area. This flaw makes it difficult for readers to identify places mentioned in the text without the aid of a supplemental map. Steamboats on the Mississippi (American Heritage, 1962; o.p.) remains a good source on Mississippi history and contains better illustrations and maps. Libraries seeking more current material about the history of the Mississippi will find this book a good replacement or companion title purchase. --Mary Mueller, Rolla Junior High School, MO (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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