Cover image for Waiting-for-papa stories
Title:
Waiting-for-papa stories
Author:
Roberts, Bethany.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
[New York] : Harper & Row, [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
31 pages : color illustrations ; 21 cm
Summary:
As Papa Rabbit's family anxiously awaits his return home, Mama Rabbit eases their fears by telling funny stories about Papa.
General Note:
"Ages 4-8"--Jkt.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780060250508

9780060250515
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

As Papa Rabbit's family anxiously awaits his return home, Mama Rabbit eases their fears by telling funny stories about Papa.


Summary

As Papa Rabbit's family anxiously awaits his return home, Mama Rabbit eases their fears by telling funny stories about Papa.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 1-3, younger for reading aloud. Papa Rabbit, gone since early morning, isn't back yet, and his family is worried. "We need some Waiting-for-Papa stories," says Mama Rabbit, who launches into a string of tales that feature Papa in an assortment of situations ranging from dangerous to comical. Of course, at the close of the last one Papa appears, and everyone breathes a sigh of relief. Stapler's watercolors are engaging, with quiet lines and softened colors that create a warm, gentle mood. The story projects a strong sense of family affection, which young children will find appealing. --Denise Wilms


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-- Seven short, whimsical tales are spun by Mama Rabbit as she and her children wait for Papa's return in this offering by the author of Waiting-for-Spring Stories (Harper, 1984). Just right for early transitional readers, the stories have an appeal similar to that of Arnold Lobel's Mouse Tales (Harper, 1972). Papa Rabbit foils would-be predators by claiming to be other than a rabbit, entertains a bored flower, enjoys a cleansing walk in the rain, and has other mini-adventures that should keep young readers and listeners interested. Children will see themselves in the kite that is having such fun flying that it doesn't want to go home, and they will recognize Papa Rabbit's attempts to persuade it to come down. Stapler's illustrations suit the stories well. Her rabbits inhabit a brighter and more elaborate home than William Joyce's rustic settings of the earlier book. Little details such as the bunny slippers in the bedroom and the bunny dolls held by some of the children add interest. The overall feeling is a cozy one of family warmth. Children are sure to be captivated by the charm and gentle humor of the stories. --Louise L. Sherman, Anna C. Scott School, Leonia, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 1-3, younger for reading aloud. Papa Rabbit, gone since early morning, isn't back yet, and his family is worried. "We need some Waiting-for-Papa stories," says Mama Rabbit, who launches into a string of tales that feature Papa in an assortment of situations ranging from dangerous to comical. Of course, at the close of the last one Papa appears, and everyone breathes a sigh of relief. Stapler's watercolors are engaging, with quiet lines and softened colors that create a warm, gentle mood. The story projects a strong sense of family affection, which young children will find appealing. --Denise Wilms


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-- Seven short, whimsical tales are spun by Mama Rabbit as she and her children wait for Papa's return in this offering by the author of Waiting-for-Spring Stories (Harper, 1984). Just right for early transitional readers, the stories have an appeal similar to that of Arnold Lobel's Mouse Tales (Harper, 1972). Papa Rabbit foils would-be predators by claiming to be other than a rabbit, entertains a bored flower, enjoys a cleansing walk in the rain, and has other mini-adventures that should keep young readers and listeners interested. Children will see themselves in the kite that is having such fun flying that it doesn't want to go home, and they will recognize Papa Rabbit's attempts to persuade it to come down. Stapler's illustrations suit the stories well. Her rabbits inhabit a brighter and more elaborate home than William Joyce's rustic settings of the earlier book. Little details such as the bunny slippers in the bedroom and the bunny dolls held by some of the children add interest. The overall feeling is a cozy one of family warmth. Children are sure to be captivated by the charm and gentle humor of the stories. --Louise L. Sherman, Anna C. Scott School, Leonia, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.