Cover image for Talking poetry : conversations in the workshop with contemporary poets
Title:
Talking poetry : conversations in the workshop with contemporary poets
Author:
Bartlett, Lee, 1950-
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, [1987]

©1987
Physical Description:
x, 295 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
General Note:
Interviews held at various workshops at the University of New Mexico from 1983 to 1985.

Includes index.
Language:
English
Genre:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780826309112

9780826309129
Format :
Book

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Reviews 2

Choice Review

Bartlett has assembled an excellent set of interviews with poets who are generally not in the mainstream of poetic fashion. Thom Gunn, Ishmael Reed, and William Everson are the best-known writers represented. There are interviews with poets associated with the language movement, like Clark Coolidge; with ``ethnopoetics,'' like Nathaniel Tarn; with Naropa Institute, like Anne Waldman. Poets influenced by Charles Olson and Robert Creeley are here too-Stephen Rodefer, Diane Wakoski, Theodore Enslin, and Kenneth Irby. The interviews are rich in insights into craft and the poetic scene, and biographical details abound. One very useful feature for the reader unfamiliar with these poets is the reprinting of representative poems after the interviews, and there is a bibliographical section at the end of the collection that shows just how widely published they are. This book is an indispensable supplement to American Poetry Observed, ed. by Joe David Bellamy (1984), a gathering of interviews with writers more in fashion, although not necessarily more important. A stimulating book for all libraries collecting modern poetry.-B. Almon, University of Alberta


Choice Review

Bartlett has assembled an excellent set of interviews with poets who are generally not in the mainstream of poetic fashion. Thom Gunn, Ishmael Reed, and William Everson are the best-known writers represented. There are interviews with poets associated with the language movement, like Clark Coolidge; with ``ethnopoetics,'' like Nathaniel Tarn; with Naropa Institute, like Anne Waldman. Poets influenced by Charles Olson and Robert Creeley are here too-Stephen Rodefer, Diane Wakoski, Theodore Enslin, and Kenneth Irby. The interviews are rich in insights into craft and the poetic scene, and biographical details abound. One very useful feature for the reader unfamiliar with these poets is the reprinting of representative poems after the interviews, and there is a bibliographical section at the end of the collection that shows just how widely published they are. This book is an indispensable supplement to American Poetry Observed, ed. by Joe David Bellamy (1984), a gathering of interviews with writers more in fashion, although not necessarily more important. A stimulating book for all libraries collecting modern poetry.-B. Almon, University of Alberta