Cover image for Oh, brother
Title:
Oh, brother
Author:
Yorinks, Arthur.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1989.
Physical Description:
40 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 32 cm
Summary:
Milton and Morris, two orphaned immigrant brothers in New York, brave their way in the New World taking jobs as trapeze artists, fruit peddlers, and tailors, and discover life's bitter realities.
General Note:
"Michael de Capua Books."
Language:
English
Geographic Term:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780374355999
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Searching...
PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Milton and Morris, two orphaned immigrant brothers in New York, brave their way in the New World taking jobs as trapeze artists, fruit peddlers, and tailors, and discover life's bitter realities.


Author Notes

Arthur Yorinks was born in Roslyn, New York on August 21, 1953. His first children's book, Sid and Sol, was published in 1977. He has written over 30 children's books including Louis the Fish, It Happened in Pinsk, Company's Coming, Christmas in July, Whitefish Will Rides Again!, The Miami Giant, and Tomatoes from Mars. Hey, Al, illustrated by Richard Egielski, won the 1987 Caldecott award. He has also written opera librettos, ballets, plays and film scripts.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 5-8. Move over Al, Irv Irving, and Louis the Fish. Yorinks and Egielski have created two new heroes cut from the same irascible cloth. Milton and Morris are contentious twins orphaned when "a sorry accident at sea" blows up the ship taking them to America (though the pictures prove that M and M have been dipping into the powder keg). Left alone on the streets of New York, they are shuffled from orphanage to orphanage until they take their fate into their own hands and join the circus. Promoted from elephant washers to trapeze artists ("What glamour. What fame. What costumes!"), the boys nevertheless continue their incessant arguing. No matter what they undertake--selling apples, singing on street corners--the disagreements continue. Only after being taken in by a kindly tailor who teaches them his trade do the boys settle down. When the man dies, Milton and Morris, in order to stay together, disguise themselves as little old men and continue their tailoring, dressing everyone from the Rockefellers to Fred Astaire. The Guggenheims take them to England to meet the royal family, but as luck would have it, they find their own parents, who escaped the shipwreck and have been looking for the boys ever since. While the story trails off at the conclusion and doesn't have the edge of, for instance, It Happened in Pinsk [BKL F 1 84], it still has plenty of the tongue-in-cheekiness that fans of Yorinks and Egielski have come to expect. Especially fine are the oversize pictures whose piquant touches (white-bearded and bewigged boys wearing black armbands) carry the laughs beyond their natural boundaries. The turn-of-the-century New York City ambience adds an evocative note to a silly, savvy story. --Ilene Cooper


Publisher's Weekly Review

Washed ashore after a shipwreck, two brothers are left to fend for themselves in New York. The boys comfort one another in a way familiar to all brothers: ``You stink,'' says Milton; ``So do you,'' replies Morris. Their fortunes rise and fall in comically rapid succession until an old man takes them under his wing and teaches them his trade--tailoring. When their benefactor dies, the resourceful brothers disguise themselves as old men and claim to be the tailor's relatives; they manage to quell their squabbling long enough to build a substantial business. A wealthy patron takes the boys abroad and presents them at court, where they are recognized by their true parents, who had survived the shipwreck after all. Although the book is long on plot and relies heavily on fantastic coincidences, Yorinks's droll storytelling talents are perfectly matched by Egielski's broadly theatrical paintings. The rollercoaster series of events abounds with ironic humor in this stylish and satisfying work. All ages. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4¬ĎThe uproarious misadventures of quarrelsome twins as they make their way from Rotten's Home for Lost Boys to the Queen of England's court, squabbling all the while. A playful look at brotherly love, executed with a deadpan delivery and jolly good humor bursting from the illustrations. (Dec. 1989) (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.