Cover image for Elementary equilibrium chemistry of carbon
Title:
Elementary equilibrium chemistry of carbon
Author:
Urry, Grant.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Wiley, [1989]

©1989
Physical Description:
xv, 223 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
General Note:
"A Wiley-Interscience publication."
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780471847403
Format :
Book

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QD181.C1 U77 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

A concise, systematic evaluation of redox disproportionation reactions of elemental carbon in intermediate oxidation states, showing how the products of these reactions can be altered by adjusting conditions of the equilibrium system. Covers many of the classes of organic compounds used in industry and provides background historical information.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

This is a somewhat unusual book! The theme throughout is carbonaceous materials but the content ranges widely to include such seemingly disparate topics as reactions of graphite, the chemistry of cellulose, the chemistry of acetic acid (which the author puzzlingly classifies as a carbohydrate), borane chemistry, nitrogen fixation by carbon, sodium carbonate crystal structure, and carbon suboxide and its analogs. In florid style, Urry manages to inject his somewhat unorthodox views on current environmental issues such as the greenhouse effect and burning of forests and grasslands. Although he frequently refers to his own research, all references are to "work in progress," "unpublished results," or US and European patent applications. There are some long passages on technical procedures lacking references. It was sometimes difficult for this reviewer to decide whether explanations of phenomena given were the author's opinions or reasoned hypotheses of others based upon their experimental work, again because of the lack of documentation. It is difficult to define the purpose of this work or its intended readership. -K. L. Marsi, California State University, Long Beach