Cover image for Working women on the Hollywood screen : a filmography
Title:
Working women on the Hollywood screen : a filmography
Author:
Galerstein, Carolyn L., 1931-
Publication Information:
New York : Garland, 1989.
Physical Description:
xx, 470 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780824056421
Format :
Book

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PN1995.9.W6 G34 1989 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Summary

Summary

Documents the perceived role of women in American society as presented on screen from 1930 to 1975. Most of the categories in the book are those commonly seen as "women's occupations," but there are a few entries in occupational categories traditionally seen as masculine. Annotation(c) 2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Galerstein lists approximately 4,500 American feature films released between 1930 and 1975 in which the leading female role is that of a working woman. The introduction has observations about the way working women have been depicted in the movies, noting that "with few exceptions, women are rescued from the drudgery of work or the inappropriateness of their profession so that they can enter into a conventional family life." The book is arranged by occupation (criminal, entertainer, journalist, nurse, secretary, etc.) and then by year. Entries include the title of the film, the name of the leading actress, the studio, and the director. A few selected films have annotations. There is an actress index and a movie index. Kaye Sullivan's Films For, By and About Women (1st series, CH, Oct '80; 2nd series, 1985) covers a variety of films, all entries are annotated, and there are subject indexes. The American Film Institute's detailed Catalog of Motion Pictures Produced in the U.S.: Feature Films so far covers only 1911-30 and 1961-70, but also has a subject index. Galerstein's filmography, focusing on working women, will be of interest to larger women's studies and film collections. -M. McCormick, University of California, Los Angeles