Cover image for Nicholas Cricket
Title:
Nicholas Cricket
Author:
Maxner, Joyce.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
[New York] : Harper & Row, [1989]

©1989
Physical Description:
25 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 25 cm
Summary:
Nicholas Cricket and the other members of the Bug-a-Wug Cricket Band lead all the forest creatures in a musical celebration of the night.
General Note:
"Ages 4-8"--Jacket.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780060242169

9780060242220
Format :
Book

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

Maxner's first book for children is a whimsical celebration of summer nights, blending soothing lyricism with rollicking rhythms as the Bug-a-Wug Crickets perform for their insect and animal friends. Full-color illustrations.


Summary

Nicholas Cricket and the other members of the Bug-a-Wug Cricket Band lead all the forest creatures in a musical celebration of the night.


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Ages 5-8. "Nicholas Cricket plays every night / in the Bug-a-Wug Cricket Band. / Moonlight glows and summer wind blows, / rabbits come dancing on tippy toes. / The music is just so grand!" That lilting opening is a beguiling entree into a nocturnal fantasy in which Nicholas Cricket and his band play dazzling good-time music for the residents of nearby fields and streams. Joyce's imaginative pictures, see issue cover, depart from the expected by casting much of the action in a decidedly uptown mode. Top-hatted gents squire ladies in gowns in and out of clubs that ooze sophistication--no mean feat, considering these are insects and animals. The palette is dark, the creatures sleek and distinctive--Nicholas and company sport four suit-coated limbs, the better to fiddle and strum. A splendid toe-tapping night for all. --Denise Wilms


Publisher's Weekly Review

In PW 's words, ``Joyce cleverly evokes the dimly lit speakeasies of Hollywood. Monocled, zoot-suited insects frequent Nick's Cafe where . . . a turtle sports a top hat, and at dawn `the Bug-a-Wugs grow sleepy and still.' '' Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 4-- Perhaps it's the jacket art's portrait of our hero with two perfectly functional sets of arms spotlighted on a stage that generates the aura of fantasy. Or it might even be the hint of the quasi-classical Butterfly's Ball in the sequence of scenes showing the arrival of the insects to Nick's place to dance the night away to the tunes of the Bug-a-Wug Cricket Band. The poem's refrain tells readers that ``The music is just so grand,'' and there's a foot-tapping beat to the variously rhymed lines that demands reading aloud to validate the claim. Phrases such as: ``Slap-a-spoon drummers and the crick-crick-crickety kazoo hummers'' typify the descriptive candences. Comes the dawn, all ``go back with the moonlight under the hill.'' The paintings are not always as joyous. There is in their frequent use of shadow and silhouette a touch of the mysterious, even the sinister. In the creation of his cast of anthropomorphic critters and in setting them into melodramatic and crowded scenes, Joyce creates a benign Walpurgisnacht. One double-page spread depicts a club full of frenzied dancers that rivals one from one of the Star Wars films. With Joyce's illustrations, it's not just the music that's ``so grand.'' --Kenneth Marantz, Art Education Department, Ohio State University, Columbus (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Ages 5-8. "Nicholas Cricket plays every night / in the Bug-a-Wug Cricket Band. / Moonlight glows and summer wind blows, / rabbits come dancing on tippy toes. / The music is just so grand!" That lilting opening is a beguiling entree into a nocturnal fantasy in which Nicholas Cricket and his band play dazzling good-time music for the residents of nearby fields and streams. Joyce's imaginative pictures, see issue cover, depart from the expected by casting much of the action in a decidedly uptown mode. Top-hatted gents squire ladies in gowns in and out of clubs that ooze sophistication--no mean feat, considering these are insects and animals. The palette is dark, the creatures sleek and distinctive--Nicholas and company sport four suit-coated limbs, the better to fiddle and strum. A splendid toe-tapping night for all. --Denise Wilms


Publisher's Weekly Review

In PW 's words, ``Joyce cleverly evokes the dimly lit speakeasies of Hollywood. Monocled, zoot-suited insects frequent Nick's Cafe where . . . a turtle sports a top hat, and at dawn `the Bug-a-Wugs grow sleepy and still.' '' Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 4-- Perhaps it's the jacket art's portrait of our hero with two perfectly functional sets of arms spotlighted on a stage that generates the aura of fantasy. Or it might even be the hint of the quasi-classical Butterfly's Ball in the sequence of scenes showing the arrival of the insects to Nick's place to dance the night away to the tunes of the Bug-a-Wug Cricket Band. The poem's refrain tells readers that ``The music is just so grand,'' and there's a foot-tapping beat to the variously rhymed lines that demands reading aloud to validate the claim. Phrases such as: ``Slap-a-spoon drummers and the crick-crick-crickety kazoo hummers'' typify the descriptive candences. Comes the dawn, all ``go back with the moonlight under the hill.'' The paintings are not always as joyous. There is in their frequent use of shadow and silhouette a touch of the mysterious, even the sinister. In the creation of his cast of anthropomorphic critters and in setting them into melodramatic and crowded scenes, Joyce creates a benign Walpurgisnacht. One double-page spread depicts a club full of frenzied dancers that rivals one from one of the Star Wars films. With Joyce's illustrations, it's not just the music that's ``so grand.'' --Kenneth Marantz, Art Education Department, Ohio State University, Columbus (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.