Cover image for The young artist
Title:
The young artist
Author:
Locker, Thomas, 1937-2012.
Personal Author:
Edition:
[First edition].
Publication Information:
New York : Dial Books, [1989]

©1989
Summary:
A talented young artist, commanded to paint the king's courtiers, all of whom wish to be portrayed with improved appearances, struggles with his sense of integrity which demands honest portraiture.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 5.8 0.5 47349.
ISBN:
9780803706255

9780803706279
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

A talented young artist, commanded to paint the king's courtiers, all of whom wish to be portrayed with improved appearances, struggles with his sense of integrity which demands honest portraiture.


Summary

A talented young artist, commanded to paint the king's courtiers, all of whom wish to be portrayed with improved appearances, struggles with his sense of integrity which demands honest portraiture.


Author Notes

Thomas Locker was born in New York City in 1937. In the 1960s, he began his career as a landscape painter. In 1982, he decided to try his hand at writing and illustrating children's books. His first, Where the River Begins, was named one of the 10 best illustrated children's books of 1984 in the New York Times Book Review. During his lifetime, he illustrated more than 30 children and young adult books, several of which he also wrote. Some of his works include John Muir: America's Naturalist, Anna and the Bagpiper, The Ice Horse, and The Man who Paints Nature. The books he worked on have received numerous awards including the Christopher Award, the John Burroughs Award, and the New York Times Award for best illustration. He died on March 9, 2012 at the age of 74.


Thomas Locker was born in New York City in 1937. In the 1960s, he began his career as a landscape painter. In 1982, he decided to try his hand at writing and illustrating children's books. His first, Where the River Begins, was named one of the 10 best illustrated children's books of 1984 in the New York Times Book Review. During his lifetime, he illustrated more than 30 children and young adult books, several of which he also wrote. Some of his works include John Muir: America's Naturalist, Anna and the Bagpiper, The Ice Horse, and The Man who Paints Nature. The books he worked on have received numerous awards including the Christopher Award, the John Burroughs Award, and the New York Times Award for best illustration. He died on March 9, 2012 at the age of 74.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Ages 7-10. Locker, who is noted for his landscapes, uses his area of expertise as the focal point for the story of 12-year-old Adrian Van der Weld, apprenticed to a painter. The artist, who narrates the story, teaches the young boy how to paint the landscapes that he loves but also arranges for Adrian to do portraits to earn money. When the young man is ordered by the king to paint the members of the royal court, the experience is as bad as Adrian expected--people want to be depicted the way they wish they looked. Instead of following the king's command, Adrian spends his time drawing the young princess. Despite the courtiers' denunciations, the king realizes Adrian appreciates true beauty and rewards him. Locker's story, a more sophisticated version of Tomie dePaola's recent Art Lesson [BKL Mr 1 89], will be best appreciated by older readers who can sympathize with Adrian's moral dilemma. As in Locker's other books, the artwork is breathtaking; like Adrian, Locker does his best work when painting the scenic vistas and compelling sunsets that grace the pages here. --Ilene Cooper


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4-- Adrian Van der Weld is gifted, but angrily rejects portrait painting when his first commission fails to jibe with the sitter's view of himself. He wants to paint landscapes; ``big paintings of the trees, the clouds, and the royal castle.'' When he is summoned to the castle, however, he is commanded to paint a group portrait of all 27 courtiers. Defying their demands that he ``improve'' their present appearance for the portrait, Adrian spends two years stalling and painting portraits of the king's pretty little daughter. This unprofessional behavior is, however, rewarded by the infatuated father: Adrian is given land and a house (not the daughter), and returns to landscape. The Young Artist looks like a picture book. It has 16 glossy ``high art'' paintings, most of them alluding to 17-century Dutch landscapes and interiors. It lacks, however, both the integration of illustration and text that characterizes true picture books and a clear sense of its audience. The story is sophisticated, despite some weaknesses (how could Adrian, raised ``near the royal castle,'' be completely unaware that ``the king was feared throughout the land?''). More seriously, the central conflict is historically questionable. Ideas about landscape painting (particularly that it is more ``honest'' than portrait painting, a Romantic 19th-century notion), crucial to the story, are not appropriate to the specific time and place evoked by the illustrations. --Patricia Dooley, University of Washington, Seattle (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Ages 7-10. Locker, who is noted for his landscapes, uses his area of expertise as the focal point for the story of 12-year-old Adrian Van der Weld, apprenticed to a painter. The artist, who narrates the story, teaches the young boy how to paint the landscapes that he loves but also arranges for Adrian to do portraits to earn money. When the young man is ordered by the king to paint the members of the royal court, the experience is as bad as Adrian expected--people want to be depicted the way they wish they looked. Instead of following the king's command, Adrian spends his time drawing the young princess. Despite the courtiers' denunciations, the king realizes Adrian appreciates true beauty and rewards him. Locker's story, a more sophisticated version of Tomie dePaola's recent Art Lesson [BKL Mr 1 89], will be best appreciated by older readers who can sympathize with Adrian's moral dilemma. As in Locker's other books, the artwork is breathtaking; like Adrian, Locker does his best work when painting the scenic vistas and compelling sunsets that grace the pages here. --Ilene Cooper


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4-- Adrian Van der Weld is gifted, but angrily rejects portrait painting when his first commission fails to jibe with the sitter's view of himself. He wants to paint landscapes; ``big paintings of the trees, the clouds, and the royal castle.'' When he is summoned to the castle, however, he is commanded to paint a group portrait of all 27 courtiers. Defying their demands that he ``improve'' their present appearance for the portrait, Adrian spends two years stalling and painting portraits of the king's pretty little daughter. This unprofessional behavior is, however, rewarded by the infatuated father: Adrian is given land and a house (not the daughter), and returns to landscape. The Young Artist looks like a picture book. It has 16 glossy ``high art'' paintings, most of them alluding to 17-century Dutch landscapes and interiors. It lacks, however, both the integration of illustration and text that characterizes true picture books and a clear sense of its audience. The story is sophisticated, despite some weaknesses (how could Adrian, raised ``near the royal castle,'' be completely unaware that ``the king was feared throughout the land?''). More seriously, the central conflict is historically questionable. Ideas about landscape painting (particularly that it is more ``honest'' than portrait painting, a Romantic 19th-century notion), crucial to the story, are not appropriate to the specific time and place evoked by the illustrations. --Patricia Dooley, University of Washington, Seattle (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.