Cover image for Grandma remembers
Title:
Grandma remembers
Author:
Shecter, Ben.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York, NY : Harper & Row, [1989]

©1989
Summary:
A boy and his grandmother take a final tour of the house she is leaving and relive memories of the wonderful times experienced there.
General Note:
"A Charlotte Zolotow book."
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780060256173

9780060256180
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

A boy and his grandmother take a final tour of the house she is leaving and relive memories of the wonderful times experienced there.


Summary

A boy and his grandmother take a final tour of the house she is leaving and relive memories of the wonderful times experienced there.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Ages 4-6. Grandma is moving from the house where she lived so many years with Grandpa; before she departs, she walks the empty rooms with her grandson, the two of them fondly recalling many happy times. Though it's implicit that Grandpa has died and that Grandma is facing a great change, the story stresses the positive: warm memories are lasting and the future is welcome--"Off to a new home . . . to see and do and hear new things," says Grandma. The story's quiet lesson is valuable, and Shecter's subdued watercolors emphasize the close ties between the unnamed boy and his grandmother (though she looks more like a great-grandmother). Thoughtful and soothing. --Denise Wilms


Booklist Review

Ages 4-6. Grandma is moving from the house where she lived so many years with Grandpa; before she departs, she walks the empty rooms with her grandson, the two of them fondly recalling many happy times. Though it's implicit that Grandpa has died and that Grandma is facing a great change, the story stresses the positive: warm memories are lasting and the future is welcome--"Off to a new home . . . to see and do and hear new things," says Grandma. The story's quiet lesson is valuable, and Shecter's subdued watercolors emphasize the close ties between the unnamed boy and his grandmother (though she looks more like a great-grandmother). Thoughtful and soothing. --Denise Wilms