Cover image for Hey! get off our train
Title:
Hey! get off our train
Author:
Burningham, John.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First American edition.
Publication Information:
New York, N.Y. : Crown Publishers, [1989]

©1989
Physical Description:
48 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 24 x 30 cm
Summary:
At bedtime a young boy takes a trip on his toy train and rescues several endangered animals.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.4 0.5 5470.
ISBN:
9780517576380

9780517576434
Format :
Book

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PIC. BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

At bedtime a young boy takes a trip on his toy train and rescues several endangered animals.


Summary

At bedtime a young boy takes a trip on his toy train and rescues several endangered animals.


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Ages 5-8. Though some may find this story didactic, the environmentally aware will see it as an effective and appealing vehicle to share their concerns with children. A mother's disruption of her son's before-bed playtime with his toy railroad leads to a dream in which he and his dog take a train trip around the world. Along the way, they are joined by various animals--an elephant wanting protection from ivory seekers, a seal fearing the polluted sea, a polar bear running from fur trappers, a crane decrying the draining of marshes, and a tiger facing the loss of his forest home. At the close, Burningham's dry humor takes the edge off the message, as the boy wakes in the morning to his mother's question of whether all those animals in the house have anything to do with him. Charcoal lines skimmed with light colors are used to show the action, while striking, full-color spreads offer panoramic views of the journey. The author's playful handling of the story and his invigorating, skillfully wrought illustrations make this useful for reading aloud, even to older students. --Barbara Elleman


Publisher's Weekly Review

Burningham's witty, pointed story describes how a boy and his stuffed-toy dog rescue various endangered animals during a nighttime trip aboard a toy train. Ages 4-9. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-- In a dream sequence, a boy and his canine companion board his toy train for a trip around the world. They interrupt their journey to get off the train and play, but when they return they discover that an uninvited elephant has come on board. The pair are indignant--until they learn of the elephant's plight: he has become an endangered species because of his tusks. In their travels, they in turn encounter a seal, a crane, a tiger, and a polar bear, each recounting the environmental hazards that threaten its survival. The animals are then welcomed aboard. In the final scene, when the boy's mother comes to wake him, she voices her suspicions about his nocturnal activity, for the house is now full of exotic animals. The book's message is loud and clear. While readers will be in complete sympathy with the philosophy espoused here, they may resent the book's heavy-handedness. The pen-and-ink/pastel sketches of the boy and the animals have an endearing innocence, and there is a Turner-like quality in the full-page illustrations that depict an old-fashioned, coal-powered locomotive bursting with power and energy as it clatters along. Good intentions, laudable as they may be, do not make a successful picture book. --Phyllis G. Sidorsky, National Cathedral School, Washington, DC (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Ages 5-8. Though some may find this story didactic, the environmentally aware will see it as an effective and appealing vehicle to share their concerns with children. A mother's disruption of her son's before-bed playtime with his toy railroad leads to a dream in which he and his dog take a train trip around the world. Along the way, they are joined by various animals--an elephant wanting protection from ivory seekers, a seal fearing the polluted sea, a polar bear running from fur trappers, a crane decrying the draining of marshes, and a tiger facing the loss of his forest home. At the close, Burningham's dry humor takes the edge off the message, as the boy wakes in the morning to his mother's question of whether all those animals in the house have anything to do with him. Charcoal lines skimmed with light colors are used to show the action, while striking, full-color spreads offer panoramic views of the journey. The author's playful handling of the story and his invigorating, skillfully wrought illustrations make this useful for reading aloud, even to older students. --Barbara Elleman


Publisher's Weekly Review

Burningham's witty, pointed story describes how a boy and his stuffed-toy dog rescue various endangered animals during a nighttime trip aboard a toy train. Ages 4-9. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-- In a dream sequence, a boy and his canine companion board his toy train for a trip around the world. They interrupt their journey to get off the train and play, but when they return they discover that an uninvited elephant has come on board. The pair are indignant--until they learn of the elephant's plight: he has become an endangered species because of his tusks. In their travels, they in turn encounter a seal, a crane, a tiger, and a polar bear, each recounting the environmental hazards that threaten its survival. The animals are then welcomed aboard. In the final scene, when the boy's mother comes to wake him, she voices her suspicions about his nocturnal activity, for the house is now full of exotic animals. The book's message is loud and clear. While readers will be in complete sympathy with the philosophy espoused here, they may resent the book's heavy-handedness. The pen-and-ink/pastel sketches of the boy and the animals have an endearing innocence, and there is a Turner-like quality in the full-page illustrations that depict an old-fashioned, coal-powered locomotive bursting with power and energy as it clatters along. Good intentions, laudable as they may be, do not make a successful picture book. --Phyllis G. Sidorsky, National Cathedral School, Washington, DC (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.