Cover image for Losing Joe's place
Title:
Losing Joe's place
Author:
Korman, Gordon.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Scholastic Inc., [1990]

©1990
Physical Description:
233 pages ; 23 cm
Summary:
Jason and his two friends move into Jason's brother's apartment and manage to wreak havoc in it during one funny and memorable summer.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
790 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 5.5 8.0 6049.

Reading Counts RC High School 6.1 14 Quiz: 07087 Guided reading level: Y.
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780590427685

9780590427692
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Jason and his two friends move into Jason's brother's apartment and manage to wreak havoc in it during one funny and memorable summer.


Summary

Joe Cardone is about the coolest big brother a guy could ask for...at least that's what Jason thinks. How is going to let Jason use his apartment for the entire summer and drive his black Camaro. But there is one catch: Jason cannot under any circumstances put Joe in jeopardy of losing his lease.


Author Notes

Gordon Korman was born in Montreal, Canada on October 23, 1963. When his 7th-grade English teacher told the class they could have 45 minutes a day for four months to work on a story of their choice, Korman began This Can't Be Happening at Macdonald Hall. He was also the class monitor for the Scholastic TAB Book Club, so he sent his novel to the address on the TAB flyer, and a few days after his 14th birthday, he had a book contract with Scholastic.

By the time he graduated from high school, he had published five other novels and several articles for Canadian newspapers. He received a BFA degree from New York University with a major in Dramatic Writing and a minor in Film and TV. He has written over 75 books for children and young adults including the Swindle series, The Juvie Three, and two books of poetry written by the fictional character Jeremy Bloom.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Gordon Korman was born in Montreal, Canada on October 23, 1963. When his 7th-grade English teacher told the class they could have 45 minutes a day for four months to work on a story of their choice, Korman began This Can't Be Happening at Macdonald Hall. He was also the class monitor for the Scholastic TAB Book Club, so he sent his novel to the address on the TAB flyer, and a few days after his 14th birthday, he had a book contract with Scholastic.

By the time he graduated from high school, he had published five other novels and several articles for Canadian newspapers. He received a BFA degree from New York University with a major in Dramatic Writing and a minor in Film and TV. He has written over 75 books for children and young adults including the Swindle series, The Juvie Three, and two books of poetry written by the fictional character Jeremy Bloom.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Confident that they won't jeopardize his brother Joe's apartment lease, 16-year-old Jason Cardone and his two best friends (who don't get along) embark on an adultless summer in Joe's bachelor pad, certain they will have the time of their lives. Unfortunately, Joe never prepared them for his irritating landlord, Mr. Plotnick, who eavesdrops on their conversations and gouges them for every penny he can. Nor is the trio prepared for pretty Jessica Lincoln or Rootbeer Racinette, a seven-foot retired alligator wrestler who barges through their bathroom window, eats 18 cans of soup in one sitting, and announces plans to stay and take up a hobby to ease his tension. Then, too, nobody is expecting Mr. Plotnick to hurt his back and have Jason turn the landlord's greasy-spoon, ground-floor deli into the trendiest restaurant in town. Those are just the highlights of Korman's latest novel, a frenetic string of funny scenes (eventually dovetailing into a plot), supported by a handful of sturdy, basically weird characters and a generous dose of pure slapstick. Rootbeer's bizarre antics and the boys' rivalry over Jessica are simple-hearted in comedic appeal, but part of the humor is derived from negative stereotyping. Consequently, while some readers will laugh out loud, others may not appreciate the mockery. Gr. 9-12. ~--Stephanie Zvirin


School Library Journal Review

Gr 6-9-- The summer before their senior year, Jason and his friends Don and Ferguson get a golden opportunity to declare their independence by subletting Jason's older brother Joe's Toronto apartment. All the boys have to do--after convincing their skeptical parents to let them try this experiment--is to pay the rent each month. But they hadn't yet met their landlord, Mr. Plotnick, who also owns the deli below. And they hadn't known about Joe's friend Rootbeer, who wanders in and out of the apartment at will, who is enormous and eccentric, and whose attention span is so limited that he develops a new, increasingly bizarre hobby every day. And they hadn't figured on Plotnick's back trouble and their own involvement--so to speak--in managing the deli. Nor had they contemplated that Joe's Camaro, part of the sublet deal, would be mistakenly identified as a stolen car and be towed away. And much, much more. Surprisingly, it's not the quick twists and turns of the farcical plot that keep this very funny story moving. It's Jason's spirited narrative, his self-effacing sense of humor, and his finely tuned ear for the ridiculous that make these unbelievable antics work and create characters from these caricatures. Young readers will either put this down early with a groan--or, more likely, they'll speed through, slowed down only by uncontrollable laughing fits. --Jack Forman, Mesa College Library, San Diego (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Confident that they won't jeopardize his brother Joe's apartment lease, 16-year-old Jason Cardone and his two best friends (who don't get along) embark on an adultless summer in Joe's bachelor pad, certain they will have the time of their lives. Unfortunately, Joe never prepared them for his irritating landlord, Mr. Plotnick, who eavesdrops on their conversations and gouges them for every penny he can. Nor is the trio prepared for pretty Jessica Lincoln or Rootbeer Racinette, a seven-foot retired alligator wrestler who barges through their bathroom window, eats 18 cans of soup in one sitting, and announces plans to stay and take up a hobby to ease his tension. Then, too, nobody is expecting Mr. Plotnick to hurt his back and have Jason turn the landlord's greasy-spoon, ground-floor deli into the trendiest restaurant in town. Those are just the highlights of Korman's latest novel, a frenetic string of funny scenes (eventually dovetailing into a plot), supported by a handful of sturdy, basically weird characters and a generous dose of pure slapstick. Rootbeer's bizarre antics and the boys' rivalry over Jessica are simple-hearted in comedic appeal, but part of the humor is derived from negative stereotyping. Consequently, while some readers will laugh out loud, others may not appreciate the mockery. Gr. 9-12. ~--Stephanie Zvirin


School Library Journal Review

Gr 6-9-- The summer before their senior year, Jason and his friends Don and Ferguson get a golden opportunity to declare their independence by subletting Jason's older brother Joe's Toronto apartment. All the boys have to do--after convincing their skeptical parents to let them try this experiment--is to pay the rent each month. But they hadn't yet met their landlord, Mr. Plotnick, who also owns the deli below. And they hadn't known about Joe's friend Rootbeer, who wanders in and out of the apartment at will, who is enormous and eccentric, and whose attention span is so limited that he develops a new, increasingly bizarre hobby every day. And they hadn't figured on Plotnick's back trouble and their own involvement--so to speak--in managing the deli. Nor had they contemplated that Joe's Camaro, part of the sublet deal, would be mistakenly identified as a stolen car and be towed away. And much, much more. Surprisingly, it's not the quick twists and turns of the farcical plot that keep this very funny story moving. It's Jason's spirited narrative, his self-effacing sense of humor, and his finely tuned ear for the ridiculous that make these unbelievable antics work and create characters from these caricatures. Young readers will either put this down early with a groan--or, more likely, they'll speed through, slowed down only by uncontrollable laughing fits. --Jack Forman, Mesa College Library, San Diego (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.