Cover image for Maxine in the middle
Title:
Maxine in the middle
Author:
Keller, Holly.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Greenwillow Books, [1989]

©1989
Summary:
Tired of being neither the oldest nor the youngest child, Maxine decides to leave home.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780688081508

9780688081515
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Tired of being neither the oldest nor the youngest child, Maxine decides to leave home.


Summary

Tired of being neither the oldest nor the youngest child, Maxine decides to leave home.


Author Notes

Holly Keller is the author-illustrator of more than thirty-five books for young children including the Horace books, Farfallina and Marcel, Help!, and Grandfather's Dream. She has also illustrated over twenty nonfiction titles written by others including the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science Books series. She won the 2003 Charlotte Zolotow Award.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Holly Keller is the author-illustrator of more than thirty-five books for young children including the Horace books, Farfallina and Marcel, Help!, and Grandfather's Dream. She has also illustrated over twenty nonfiction titles written by others including the Let's-Read-and-Find-Out Science Books series. She won the 2003 Charlotte Zolotow Award.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Ages 4-6. Maxine is the bunny in the middle. She gets stuck wearing her big sister's hand-me-downs, and she has to share her crayons with her younger brother. It seems as if Maxine is always getting the short end of the stick, so one day she decides to leave. It doesn't take her siblings long to realize that they miss their sister. To lure her back, they plan a party in her honor with ice cream and a Monkey-in-the-Middle game--and Maxine never has to be the monkey. Mama gets into the act, too. She provides doughnut holes for a snack, proving that sometimes things in the middle are best. Keller's chronicle of Maxine's trials is overly long, but otherwise this is an entertaining look at family life. The bouncy pictures executed in crisp, clear colors are fun, while amply illustrating Maxine's unhappiness. Any middle child will easily identify with this--and there's a message for other sib~lings, too. --Ilene Cooper


Publisher's Weekly Review

It isn't easy being in the middle. Hand-me-down clothing, last year's Halloween costume, and missing all the special privileges that seem to go with being oldest or youngest leaves middle-child Maxine feeling left out and unloved. Christmas dinner is the last straw. Rosalie, the oldest, gets a drumstick, and Sammy gets the other one because he is the youngest. Maxine is left out--again. When she takes up residence in the backyard tree house, it isn't long before Rosalie and Sammy begin to miss her. Games that were fun for three turn boring when there are only two. The two lonely siblings plan a party to entice Maxine back into the family. Sammy and Rosalie decorate Maxine's ice cream with a cherry and Mom serves doughnut holes with peanut butter and jelly to show that middle things are sometimes best. This tender tale dealing with the woes of the middle child is sensitively written in an unassuming, nonjudgmental manner. Ages 4-up. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-- Maxine, the middle rabbit, is caught between her two siblings. She wears her older sister's hand-me down dresses, and has to share her crayons with little brother, Sammy. After a sequence of misadventures in which she is short-changed because of her middle-child status, Maxine disappears up a tree on a snowy winter's night. She thereby makes her point, and the family celebrates with a party, games, and ``middle food''--doughnut holes and peanut butter and jelly without bread. This mildly entertaining picture book just misses the mark. Many children will be slightly baffled by what all the fuss is about, since Maxine's problems could be solved simply with a new school dress, a clever Halloween costume, and/or a new box of crayons. Although Keller's rabbit family is engaging in these energetic and colorful cartoon-like illustrations, the text is flat and predictable, lacking suspense and surprise. Rabbit sibling rivalry is handled with more subtlety by Wells in Morris' Disappearing Bag (Dial, 1978). Compared to a book which brought readers the ultimate in a frustrated and misunderstood child, Steig's Spinky Sulks (Farrar, 1988), Maxine's defection from her family seems an overreaction. This is only a ``fair to middlin'' middle-child story. --Martha Rosen, Edgewood School, Scarsdale, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Ages 4-6. Maxine is the bunny in the middle. She gets stuck wearing her big sister's hand-me-downs, and she has to share her crayons with her younger brother. It seems as if Maxine is always getting the short end of the stick, so one day she decides to leave. It doesn't take her siblings long to realize that they miss their sister. To lure her back, they plan a party in her honor with ice cream and a Monkey-in-the-Middle game--and Maxine never has to be the monkey. Mama gets into the act, too. She provides doughnut holes for a snack, proving that sometimes things in the middle are best. Keller's chronicle of Maxine's trials is overly long, but otherwise this is an entertaining look at family life. The bouncy pictures executed in crisp, clear colors are fun, while amply illustrating Maxine's unhappiness. Any middle child will easily identify with this--and there's a message for other sib~lings, too. --Ilene Cooper


Publisher's Weekly Review

It isn't easy being in the middle. Hand-me-down clothing, last year's Halloween costume, and missing all the special privileges that seem to go with being oldest or youngest leaves middle-child Maxine feeling left out and unloved. Christmas dinner is the last straw. Rosalie, the oldest, gets a drumstick, and Sammy gets the other one because he is the youngest. Maxine is left out--again. When she takes up residence in the backyard tree house, it isn't long before Rosalie and Sammy begin to miss her. Games that were fun for three turn boring when there are only two. The two lonely siblings plan a party to entice Maxine back into the family. Sammy and Rosalie decorate Maxine's ice cream with a cherry and Mom serves doughnut holes with peanut butter and jelly to show that middle things are sometimes best. This tender tale dealing with the woes of the middle child is sensitively written in an unassuming, nonjudgmental manner. Ages 4-up. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-- Maxine, the middle rabbit, is caught between her two siblings. She wears her older sister's hand-me down dresses, and has to share her crayons with little brother, Sammy. After a sequence of misadventures in which she is short-changed because of her middle-child status, Maxine disappears up a tree on a snowy winter's night. She thereby makes her point, and the family celebrates with a party, games, and ``middle food''--doughnut holes and peanut butter and jelly without bread. This mildly entertaining picture book just misses the mark. Many children will be slightly baffled by what all the fuss is about, since Maxine's problems could be solved simply with a new school dress, a clever Halloween costume, and/or a new box of crayons. Although Keller's rabbit family is engaging in these energetic and colorful cartoon-like illustrations, the text is flat and predictable, lacking suspense and surprise. Rabbit sibling rivalry is handled with more subtlety by Wells in Morris' Disappearing Bag (Dial, 1978). Compared to a book which brought readers the ultimate in a frustrated and misunderstood child, Steig's Spinky Sulks (Farrar, 1988), Maxine's defection from her family seems an overreaction. This is only a ``fair to middlin'' middle-child story. --Martha Rosen, Edgewood School, Scarsdale, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.