Cover image for Quiet
Title:
Quiet
Author:
Parnall, Peter.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Morrow Junior Books, [1989]

©1989
Physical Description:
32 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 22 x 26 cm
Summary:
A child lies quietly on the ground and waits for the animals to come near.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780688082048

9780688082055
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

A child lies quietly on the ground and waits for the animals to come near.


Summary

A child lies quietly on the ground and waits for the animals to come near.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Ages 4-7. These two books exhibit Parnall's characteristic fine-line figures and landscapes, with color used discriminately as a highlight. In Cats, the artist uses sparse, lyrical prose to pay tribute to nine stray cats (whom he calls "cats from away") that have lived on his farm in Maine. Each feline's unique personality and life story is warmly and aptly described, but the audience will be mainly cat lovers. In Quiet, a young boy communes with nature while lying silently in a grassy meadow. He is approached by a raven, a chipmunk, a bumblebee, a chickadee, and a mouse--all of whom seem unaware that they are being observed. In this offering, the artist uses color more generously; indeed, in contrast to the book's introspective story line, it almost shouts with hues of yellow, aqua, and red. A nature introduction that may help to make environmentalists out of the very young. --Kay Weisman


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2--A young boy goes into a field and lies down on his back, perfectly still, perfectly quiet, with a pile of seeds and apple cores placed on his chest. He is soon investigated by a succession of curious creatures: a chipmunk, a raven, a mouse, and two chickadees. While awaiting his visitors, the boy watches the clouds and listens to the wind, per haps the same wind that blew in ``from the sea where Vikings roamed near Maine and maybe met a bird on an out stretched hand. . .'' The book ends with the boy sitting up, a bird perched on his outstretched hand. This is defi nitely a mood piece, calling to mind some of Byrd Baylor's books. Text is minimal and poetic, with a couple of sentences per page. Illustrations are clean, detailed, but spare drawings, with lots of white shaded with soft tur quoise greens, yellow, black, and brown, occasionally punctuated by the vibrant red of the apple cores. Audi ence reaction to the book is likely to be mixed; most may find the concept inter esting but improbable. As such, it may serve to set a tone or as a starter for a discussion or creative-writing experi ence.--Denise L. Moll, Lone Pine Ele mentary School, West Bloomfield, MI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Ages 4-7. These two books exhibit Parnall's characteristic fine-line figures and landscapes, with color used discriminately as a highlight. In Cats, the artist uses sparse, lyrical prose to pay tribute to nine stray cats (whom he calls "cats from away") that have lived on his farm in Maine. Each feline's unique personality and life story is warmly and aptly described, but the audience will be mainly cat lovers. In Quiet, a young boy communes with nature while lying silently in a grassy meadow. He is approached by a raven, a chipmunk, a bumblebee, a chickadee, and a mouse--all of whom seem unaware that they are being observed. In this offering, the artist uses color more generously; indeed, in contrast to the book's introspective story line, it almost shouts with hues of yellow, aqua, and red. A nature introduction that may help to make environmentalists out of the very young. --Kay Weisman


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2--A young boy goes into a field and lies down on his back, perfectly still, perfectly quiet, with a pile of seeds and apple cores placed on his chest. He is soon investigated by a succession of curious creatures: a chipmunk, a raven, a mouse, and two chickadees. While awaiting his visitors, the boy watches the clouds and listens to the wind, per haps the same wind that blew in ``from the sea where Vikings roamed near Maine and maybe met a bird on an out stretched hand. . .'' The book ends with the boy sitting up, a bird perched on his outstretched hand. This is defi nitely a mood piece, calling to mind some of Byrd Baylor's books. Text is minimal and poetic, with a couple of sentences per page. Illustrations are clean, detailed, but spare drawings, with lots of white shaded with soft tur quoise greens, yellow, black, and brown, occasionally punctuated by the vibrant red of the apple cores. Audi ence reaction to the book is likely to be mixed; most may find the concept inter esting but improbable. As such, it may serve to set a tone or as a starter for a discussion or creative-writing experi ence.--Denise L. Moll, Lone Pine Ele mentary School, West Bloomfield, MI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.